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04 TT 225 Roadster, 82 Rabbit Diesel L
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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 82 Diesel project,
The breaks are not engaging but the peddle does not go to the floor and has pressure when depressed down. I took off the drivers side caliper to check if the piston whas seized, but it was not. I decided to remove the caliper and when disconnecting the break line no fluid came out. Even with the break line completely open the peddle still feels the same and is not just flat on the floor when depressing. Before removing the caliper I did pressure blead the system, and i did get about a quarter L out of all four corners no problem. So now i am stumped, Dose anyone have any idea where I should go from there?
 

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When I have a new to me car. The first system I look at are the brakes.
I first make sure that I can open the bleeder ports easily.
I then remove the Calipers and hone the insides and replace the seals and rubber bits. (basically rebuild them).
I remove the Rear Wheel Cylinders and replace them out of hand as they are inexpensive (you can rebuild them as well)
I also replace the parking brake cables, and bearings and seals and shoes, that way when all buttoned up, I know that I won't have to worry about the rears for a few years. Lesson learned was a 15 year old parking brake cable on my Rabbit a one owner (me). I buttoned up the rears and after power bleeding the system I pressed the pedal about 4 times, started the car drove it around the block making sure that it was braking equally and fully no sponginess then pulling it back in the Garage, and applying the e-brake POP went the cable on the Passenger side... Life lesson learned...

I also remove and replace all the rubber lines, usually I go back with the Stainless Steel Jacketed ones that have the Teflon inserts. Getting the rears off can be an issue as they are usually rusticated and a pain at the axle connection but use Brake Line Wrenches only helps as well as Brushing off all the connections and soaking in penetrant prior to wrenching. I use Teflon Tape on all connections going back. The rear axle connection can be a pain as the Keeper and the position makes it wonderfully hard to get to, and I have had to use Vice Grips to hold the one side as the keeper spun.

I also wrap all the bleeders with teflon tape and poke a hole in the tape where the bleeder port is so it can't rust seize in the caliper or in the cylinder. I also use Teflon tape on all connections. Make sure that your hardline attachment nut is free to spin on the line, and I clean the lines so that they have no corrosion to bind the nut from spinning.

Rubber brake lines that are older can delaminate internally and become restrictive to the flow of fluid.


Depending on how they delaminate they can cause the brakes to remain on, or that the fluid will not pass and if they are cracked, and such exteriorly well I replace them.

Now the left Front and Right front use a different side of the Master Cylinder, and that your master Cylinder can be the source of your issues. As The MC's are usually Crossed that is the left front and right rear are on one side and the right front and left rear are on the other. If you can bleed the opposite rear line, then the issue isn't the MC but hose that attaches to the Caliper.

If it was the rear that had the issue there is also the proportional valve that could be wonky.

When replacing hoses do BOTH, so that they have equal chances of working.
Older lines Balloon more when under pressure than newer ones, and the ballooning can be a sign of interior delamination of the line as well as a weakening due to age.

Once you have replaced all the bad things, you can then bleed the system and go to Synthetic Brake fluid which is less prone to Hygroscopic action that the older fluid is.

Side note for future reference when and if you replace your Master Cylinder remove all the lines and or switches first.
When loosening it from the Booster do each nut equally that is 4 turns or so on one side and 4 on the other until there is no resistance then you can spin them off with your fingers... a Ratcheting Articulating speed wrench is a godsend. Going back do the same, take the nuts down equally because if you don't you can **** the Booster pin and it will disconnect itself from the booster diaphragm and **** in the MC, and if you can reorient it and lock it on the booster you may be looking for a new booster...and taking a booster off is more of the PITA than you want to think about.
 

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Not to be a grammar nazi, but:
- if your Rabbit has breaking issues = it won't go or keeps falling apart
- if your Rabbit has braking issues = it won't stop
 

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Eight diesels of which five are MK1 VWs
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Not to be a grammar nazi, but:
- if your Rabbit has breaking issues = it won't go or keeps falling apart
- if your Rabbit has braking issues = it won't stop
As grammar errors go, this one could actually be a clever pun, as you pointed out. Don't we all have 'Rabbit breaking issues"? I'm gonna give OP the benefit of the doubt on this one. 👍😁👍
 

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It's always been a pet peeve with me. Most of my communication with my clients is with text [appointment, questions, etc]. Many use break vs brake. Usually by the end of the messaging they get it right.

It's not wrong to call people out on mistakes but some take it real personal. We all make them I do not see why it's a big deal.
 
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