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At least read the thread and look at the pictures before you “guess” based on anecdotes about a Ford Focus.
OhioSpyderman is probably correct.
Since the caliper is not frozen, there simply is no way for inner and outer pad to be so different.
And he was not saying the pad fell out, but that the friction material bonded to the metal pad backing plate, must have broken loose.
That actually happens easily and frequently.
The metal expands and contracts greatly with temp, while the bonded friction material does not.
 

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OhioSpyderman is probably correct.
Since the caliper is not frozen, there simply is no way for inner and outer pad to be so different.
And he was not saying the pad fell out, but that the friction material bonded to the metal pad backing plate, must have broken loose.
That actually happens easily and frequently.
The metal expands and contracts greatly with temp, while the bonded friction material does not.
I can kinda get behind that, but that still represents abysmal factory quality if the brake pads used in production are delaminating before 30k. And mine didn’t appear delam’ed / separated, from what I recall. I’ll have to look and see if I took pictures.
 

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Excessive brake pad wear has been brought up before, quite a few years ago actually.

Is this pad shared with other models? That might help identify if it's the material or the application that's the problem.

I don't have access to ETKA to check at the moment.
 

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Bob has a point. I am curious if those pads are bonded or bond/riveted? It could also be a defective caliper. If the piston was sticking in the caliper body it would drag on the disk causing wear. During light breaking conditions the piston would extend, make (pad), contact and the outside pad would experience much less pressure and therefore reduced wear. This could also occur if the slider, pins or tracked caliper type, were sticking and not working as hard as the piston side. Did the noise come on suddenly, maybe corresponding with a pulling and/or sudden slight but noticable reduction in breaking? If so my money would be on the pad being defective, especially if they are bonded pads. If the symptoms came on gradually then I would lean more toward a sticking problem.

New disk, new pads, grease the slide/pin locations on the calipers and monitor the wear often to see how it goes. If it were me I would opt for replacing the caliper on that side just to be sure.

Under no circumstance would I recommend putting pads on that damaged disk! Replace the disk. VW disks are thin to save money and weight to build cheaper and get a higher mpg. Also the disks are treated to harden the disk wear surface for longer service life under "normal" service conditions. Thay can not and therefore should never be turned. The worn surface on your damaged disk will give poor performance as is, cause excessive pad wear immediately, and avoid warranties and cause you insurance problems if they come into question during an accident investigation.

In short the cost of the disc is nescessary and the additional cost of the caliper replacement is cheap insurance.

Good luck and happy breaking!
 

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I'm not trying to stir the pot, just saying I've seen this issue before (on a different platform).
When I had the rotor turned and replaced the pads on that 2013 Focus, I checked online and there were several other complaints of the same issue.
"Stuff" happens. Parts fail.
All I'm saying is that the frequency should be far less with the cost of ownership going up.

Bob.
 

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Hey everyone, was just hoping to get some knowledge and maybe confirmation of my suspicions on an issue I’ve had recently with my 19 Tiguan. About a week ago, my wife noticed some pretty bad grinding noise coming from the back wheel. Being pretty familiar with the sound (metal on metal), I pulled the tire off to check the brakes to see what’s going on. After inspecting, I can see the inner pad (closest to the middle of the car) is completely gone! Just straight metal on rotor, thus the grinding sound. The outer pad however still has about 40-50% of the pad left. The car only has just under 50k miles on it. Since it’s still under warranty, I took it in and they keep trying to tell me it’s “normal” for the inside pad to wear quicker than the outside.

I call complete BS. I’m not a master mechanic or anything, but I do know my way around the car and I know it’s not normal for the inside pad to wear at twice the rate of the outside pad without there being something wrong. They say they checked the caliper to make sure it wasn’t sticking (which was my assumption that it was, cause you could hear the grinding even when the brakes weren’t applied, plus we haven’t been getting the greatest of MPG, about 21 on average) and they checked whatever other systems are involved and said everything checks out clean and kept trying to peddle that BS story that this is normal in this model vehicle. If this is true, then all the other pads on my car should be the same, but of course they’re not.

I had the car into the dealer about 6 months ago for standard 40k maintenance and they never said anything about it. It does sound like they are going to cover the costs of the repair though because they said I’m a “repeat customer” and value my service or something so I’m happy about that part, but I still think they realized they screwed up and missed something or found something wrong and don’t want to own up to it, but know I’ve got them in a pinch, so they are going to cover it.

What do you guys think? Is there any possible way one pad on one side could wear out completely at twice the rate of the others, under “normal” conditions?

Thanks all for the help and sorry for the long rant…


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I had a similar problem with an MY10 TDI, Each service done by dealer. I can get over 100,000 kilometres out of a set of brakes, this car had around 60,000. they said exactly what you were told. I insisted that the difference between pads was extreme, the more I insisted the more they pushed. They eventually told me my service record did not show me having my brakes replaced at THEIR nominal 50,000 ks. I argued why should I when the pads averaged less than 60% wear, and I can get over double that amount? My relationship with VW went down hill, they eventually called me a liar. I wrote to VAG head office (Germany) was ignored. In summary car was a lemon, I argued that as good as VW are surely they can accept a lemon slips through. mine being a 2009 build MY 2010 with a hybridation of components which I think was part of the problem. Mine had a clutch/flywheel failure at low k's returned ( under warranty) after much struggle with bolts missing. An Aircon fault quoted at over $1000 for a new valve, which I resolved for $240. Numerous other codes after each service. A service where the car was driven 140 k's to them ( we live rurally) that they forgot to do when we picked it up. Told the noise coming from the about to fail clutch was nothing to worry about. I bought VCDS and for 6 years I have had hardly any problems. I believe VAG train their service people to be insular and difficult, especially when reading about how many cars come out of workshops with error codes and a quote of ridiculous amounts, service items ignored in course of the service such as Haldex filters. Then to be called a liar? Good luck with yours, I hope you don't need it.
 

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Bob has a point. I am curious if those pads are bonded or bond/riveted? It could also be a defective caliper. If the piston was sticking in the caliper body it would drag on the disk causing wear. During light breaking conditions the piston would extend, make (pad), contact and the outside pad would experience much less pressure and therefore reduced wear. This could also occur if the slider, pins or tracked caliper type, were sticking and not working as hard as the piston side. Did the noise come on suddenly, maybe corresponding with a pulling and/or sudden slight but noticable reduction in breaking? If so my money would be on the pad being defective, especially if they are bonded pads. If the symptoms came on gradually then I would lean more toward a sticking problem.

New disk, new pads, grease the slide/pin locations on the calipers and monitor the wear often to see how it goes. If it were me I would opt for replacing the caliper on that side just to be sure.

Under no circumstance would I recommend putting pads on that damaged disk! Replace the disk. VW disks are thin to save money and weight to build cheaper and get a higher mpg. Also the disks are treated to harden the disk wear surface for longer service life under "normal" service conditions. Thay can not and therefore should never be turned. The worn surface on your damaged disk will give poor performance as is, cause excessive pad wear immediately, and avoid warranties and cause you insurance problems if they come into question during an accident investigation.

In short the cost of the disc is nescessary and the additional cost of the caliper replacement is cheap insurance.

Good luck and happy breaking!
Gotta put in an alert here to other readers: never heard of a rotor that could not "be turned" unless it was already too thin or damaged. It's a friction system, there will be wear on both the rotor and the pad, give and take. I have never heard of anyone not turning factory rotors on consumer-level cars like these. Never heard, since joining the VW world in 1975 with a Rabbit, that VW disks are especially "thin to save money and weight." Porsche, sure, with carbon fiber hats and titanium rivets. But not consumer-level brakes. And that ain't to save money.
 

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You could have a problem. My wife's 2017 Alltrack had uneven brake pad wear on one of the front brakes. Upon inspection what had happened is one of the little rubber booties on the brake caliper wasn't correctly put on at the factory. Over time brake dust got in so it wouldn't slide and that caused it to wear unevenly. I had to get the caliper out, which was stuck pretty good, and clean it well with brake cleaner. I replaced the brake pads, made sure to put the rubber booty on correctly, and that fixed it.
 

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Gotta put in an alert here to other readers: never heard of a rotor that could not "be turned" unless it was already too thin or damaged. It's a friction system, there will be wear on both the rotor and the pad, give and take. I have never heard of anyone not turning factory rotors on consumer-level cars like these. Never heard, since joining the VW world in 1975 with a Rabbit, that VW disks are especially "thin to save money and weight." Porsche, sure, with carbon fiber hats and titanium rivets. But not consumer-level brakes. And that ain't to save money.
When I did the brakes on my wife's car it was during the Covid supply chain crisis. I asked the VW parts counter for rotors and the clerk said they have 179 backordered. So I just got the pads and figured I will get mine turned like the old days. I called O'Reilly and they said they still do it. But it was so hard to get the rotor off I was afraid I might break it and did not have a replacement in case that happened, so I gave up and kept the existing rotors. You just reminded me I need to replace them before Winter.
 

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Gotta put in an alert here to other readers: never heard of a rotor that could not "be turned" unless it was already too thin or damaged. It's a friction system, there will be wear on both the rotor and the pad, give and take. I have never heard of anyone not turning factory rotors on consumer-level cars like these. Never heard, since joining the VW world in 1975 with a Rabbit, that VW disks are especially "thin to save money and weight." Porsche, sure, with carbon fiber hats and titanium rivets. But not consumer-level brakes. And that ain't to save money.
The point is not so much that you can NOT turn VW rotors, but that it increases potential for warpage, and there is no reason to. For example, PartsGeek sells a PAIR of VW rotors WITH pad for $90.
So then a single rotor is only about $40, and that is less than the cost of machining down an old scored rotor.
2011-2016 Volkswagen Jetta Brake Rotor - DuraGo BK7147112 - Front - PartsGeek.com
But I also don't see much rotor wear, so only replace if I allowed metal on metal with old pads. Which is fairly foolish since pads are do inexpensive and easy to do early.

But as a historical note, there was a time when shops did not have brake laths, and no one could turn rotors.
What we did instead was to temporarily replace the friction pads with abrasive pads. Then we would drive around the block a few times, resting a little weight on the brake pedal for the whole drive. The rotors were nicely polished up.
 

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Try doing your search on a Tiguan there.
No way do you get front rotors and pads for <$100.

I haven't had a rotor turned for a while, but the price to have them turned back then (2015ish) was $15 per rotor (the least I paid was $8 per several years before that).
I'm all for having a rotor turned if it can still be inside tolerances (a good shop won't turn a rotor if it's even going to be close).

Brakes are just to important to take short cuts.

Just my .02

Bob.
 
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