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Here comes a "seasonal" topic - it's freezing outside and we've finally gotten snow up here in Finland… …and I have now finally completed my heated steering wheel retrofit! As I wrote already a year ago, I exchanged the wooden wheel - which my car originally came with - for the leather wheel which is better suited for our cold climate.

I installed a heated version of the leather steering wheel. My idea was to get the heating sorted out too, but it ended up being quite a bit more complicated (read: expensive) than I had anticipated. But, as it usually happens with my projects, I end up taking the plunge anyway. Now the retrofit is complete and all is well. I am writing this post just to report how I did it. Another (probably more useful) issue I am discussing here is how you calibrate the steering angle sensor and re-code the ABS control unit. This is a required part of the retrofit and was pretty darn complicated (may even seem scary to some!)

The parts.


Now, the heated steering wheel: There are three kind of Phaeton wheels (this is valid for MY 2002-2010). They are mechanically identical with Touareg wheels of the same era (different color combos exist). There's already discussion on different wheels on this board, so I will skip to the part numbers for different wheels:

3D0 419 091 K - leather, no heat
3D0 419 091 Q - leather, heated
3D0 419 091 T - leather, heated, for certain leather colors
3D0 419 091 R - wooden, no heat

There are a lot of color codes for different leather (and wood) combinations. I will skip those now.

The heated version of the leather wheel is also recognizable by the wiring: there are two sets of wires, both with connectors at the end, coming from the recess of the wheel where the airbag goes into. There are no loose wires on non-heated wheel. A new wheel costs about 500 euros but there are (nearly un-)used ones available from eBay and elsewhere for much less (I paid 120 euros for mine).

In addition to the wheel, you will need a different type of slip ring (there are heating pins missing from the regular slip ring - who the heck would go through the trouble of making different parts for this purpose?). Phaeton slip ring has original part # 3D0 951 541 plus a letter indicating the type. There are even earlier versions, but from 2004 on the D-type is non-heat and E-type is for heated wheel.

I found the right slip ring (which is part 3D0 953 541 E: my car originally had a part ending in D) for 50 euros, used - a good bargain. The same part # is no longer available new, as it seems to be one of the parts which have been "rationalized" by VW Group. Nowadays all of the previous slip ring types are superseded with one single part, with code 8E0 953 541 E. It should fit all years and models and does support heated wheel. It costs about 250 euros new.

No, we're not done exchanging parts yet! The steering column control module needs to be changed, too! It is located behind the stalk switches and is pretty easy to get to, once you get off the steering wheel. Controller has part # 3D0 953 549 plus a letter indicating the variant. Common variants are D and E. The E-part is for heated wheel. It is rare and hard to find used. It is nowadays superseded by a new part 7L6 953 549 L. It costs about 160 euros new. Now, what's interesting is that the new 7L6… part originally comes from Touareg. And it's been used in Touaregs already when the 3D0… part was still put into the Phaetons. Funny thing is, they are fully interchangeable! So I bought the Touareg part used (coming from a 2006 Treg) for 75 euros.

So, that was all the parts needed. The lesson learned was, that all Phaeton-specific versions of slip rings and control units have been superseded with generic parts: the newest slip ring type comes from (judging by the part #) Audi A4 series (8E) and the controller originates from Touareg (7L). I wonder why did they - at one time - make specialized 3D0… parts for the Phaeton even though the parts were/are fully interchangeable with "lesser" car's parts.

That completes the parts inventory. My parts budget was: wheel 120 EUR + slip ring 50 EUR + controller 75 EUR = 245 EUR total. Warm fingers? Priceless! :)

The installation.


First of all, you cannot complete this retrofit without VCDS or dealer-only VAS programming tool. Don't even start the mechanical retrofit without having VCDS at hand as the car is barely drivable until you re-code the controllers.

Before starting any mechanical retrofit work, make sure you have notes on the current coding of the following controllers:
- ABS (#3)
- Steering wheel (#16)

The info on current coding you will find from a regular VCDS controller scan, see this example:

Code:
Address 16: Steering wheel        Labels: 3D0-953-549.lbl
   Part No: 3D0 953 549 D
   Component: Lenksälenmodul     3401  
   Coding: 0000032
   Shop #: WSC 01065 000 00000

No fault code found.
In this case, the current coding of steering wheel is "0000032". Make similar notes on the coding of ABS controller (#3).

Now let's get to the actual installation. Mechanicals are not that complicated. Get off the steering wheel. Dismantle the steering column covers. Get out the combined slip ring + stalk switch + controller assembly. It is easy to take apart on a desk and put in the new parts. I recall seeing photos of this process on the FAQ so no photos here. A few things to look out for:

- VW instructs to disconnect both batteries before removing airbag. You probably should do so. Especially if you are in the US where you have a different SRS/Airbag system. I have never disconnected my battery in order to remove steering wheel airbag. I have just turned of the car and taken out the keys. Not even a fault code has been triggered during removal/reinstall. Your mileage may wary.

- Be very careful when loosening the airbag from the wheel. There are holes where you insert a screwdriver. You should NOT mess around with the screwdriver inside the steering wheel. The screwdriver needs to be twisted into the right direction to "click" the airbag free. Do observe VW service manual's instructions when doing this!

- DO NOT mess with the slip ring! When you remove the steering wheel, the slip ring "locks" into the last position. You can not turn it (and never should!) unless you press in the little stud facing the back of the steering wheel. The locking mechanism is needed because there are thin foil conductors inside the slip ring and if you mess around with the center position, the foil conductors may "use all the slack" before the steering wheel comes to the fully turned position. This would simply snap the foil conductors and destroy the slip ring at once! As I had bought my slip ring used, someone had turned it from the "fully centered" position and I was unsure which direction I should turn it back to. I had to - very carefully - rotate it fully to the left, then fully to the right while counting the revs. Multiplying the "lock to lock" revs by two I found the "center" position and set the slip ring in that position. I got it right the first time - you would not get a second try anyway…

Other than those caveats, getting in the new parts and putting it all together was pretty simple. Now comes the hard part - CODING!

The coding.


Once you have put it all together, it's time to start the car. Beware: there will be LOTS of warnings and beeps. You will see a brake system failure and a warning will tell you not the drive the car at all. This is "normal" - eeeeks! :) Plug in the VCDS cable.

First you should code the steering wheel controller. My used part came from a Touareg and had a whole different coding and this caused quite a few (bizarre) fault codes. Coding the new controller is explained by the VCDS coding helper (Michael: result of your work, I suppose?). You need to change just one bit from the original coding to enable steering wheel heat. I will not talk about exact coding here as you need to put in whatever you had in your old controller and change the bit in question only.

When you're done with the coding, read and reset any existing fault codes on the controller (#16). After resetting the fault codes, close the controller, re-open and reread the fault codes. If there are no faults found, you're done. You should now be able to turn on the steering wheel heat by pressing the small button on the right side of the steering wheel hub. If everything's ok, you will see a green steering wheel heat symbol on the FIS display. Take your time to warm your hands on the wheel and relax. You have just one more thing to do. And boy, was that complicated and stressful for me!

The thing is, when you replace electronics on the steering column, the ABS/ESP electronics will require calibration of the steering angle sensor. The sensor is built into the slip ring and it communicates via steering column controller and drivetrain CAN BUS with various other controllers.

If you replace the slip ring only, this is simple: once you've put in the new slip ring and start the car, you will see a warning on the dash (ESP light). No beeps or blinking red lights or anything that serious. This means that the steering angle sensor needs to be calibrated. It is simple: just take the car for a spin. Turn right on a corner, turn left on a corner, drive straight for a short distance. The fastest way to calibrate is by driving an "8" on a parking lot. The yellow light will go off and all is fine.

This is not the case, however, when you replace the steering wheel controller. Meeting with a new steering column controller will totally ruin the day for the ABS control unit. It will get furious! When you start the car, you will see three warning lights on the dash: ABS, ESP and the general brake fault will lit up. The FIS will tell you not the drive the car because the braking system is at fault. When you plug in the VCDS and access controller #3 (ABS) you should see two faults:
- Steering angle sensor (G85) is not adapted
- Control unit is incorrectly coded

The latter one is can be confirmed by looking at the diagnostic scan of controller #3: the proper coding is indeed gone for good! Just zeroes are reported as the current coding and dealer code. I must say I was quite scared before I browsed the internet on this subject! I had not even touched the ABS and how come it looses its coding completely?

Yet this is normal. The ABS/ESP is a complex unit but it has a pretty primitive programming interface. I did not find any Phaeton-specific instructions on coding the ABS controller and because of this I spent a good part of last night worrying if I will ever get my beloved car back on the road again…

So, here's the instructions on how to adapt the G85 steering angle sensor and code the ABS controller. The information is from Ross-Tech, makers of VCDS, but I "copied" it from their Audi section. Both the Phaeton and several models of Audi use the Bosch ESP 5.7 system.

First, park your car with the steering wheel on dead center position. Leave on the engine. Plug in VCDS.

  1. Open the ABS controller (#3) (NOTE: Do not close the controller until you have completed all the steps below - otherwise you will have to start again from this step)
  2. Read the fault codes. You should see (in case of steering wheel retrofit) two faults: G85 not adapted and Control unit incorrectly coded. Do not worry. Proceed to next step.
  3. Login to the controller. NOTE: this is not the "security access" button, you need to click on the Coding II button instead! Weird.
  4. Enter login code. This is MODEL SPECIFIC. The coding helper will tell you what to type in. You will need to know things like engine type, brake size… As a result you will generate a 5-digit code (mine is 05456 - don't try this but use the coding helper). Press "Do it!". Controller should accept the coding. If not, you will need to try again to get the code right. You CAN NOT proceed to next step unless you got the coding accepted
  5. Now it is time to actually code the controller. Select Coding-button from the controller menu. Now enter exactly the same coding (and preferably workshop ID) which you had written down from your VCDS scan before you even started with the retrofit. In case you don't know the right code, the coding helper should help you figure it out. Press "Do it!". The controller should accept the coding and it should now be displayed on the controller main screen as well.
  6. Now calibrate the G85 sensor. NOTE: if you don't calibrate now and just close the controller it will loose the coding again! Start by turning the steering wheel by at least 30 degs to the left and then turn it back to dead center. You don't need to move the car. Put the wheel as straight as you possibly can (if your steering wheel is not straight when the car is moving straight ahead you should put it into that position) NOTE: some calibration instructions now tell you to observe the angle readings from Measuring blocks (group 005). This field is not updated by the Phaeton's ABS controller while in coding mode, so don't bother.
  7. Press on Coding II button (again!) Now, instead of the vehicle-specific coding, enter 40168 to enter the calibration mode. Press "Do it!". The coding should be accepted. If not, you're missing some of the prerequisites for the calibration. Is the engine running? Did you complete all the previous steps successfully? You did not close the controller at any time during the process? You turned the steering wheel to the left and then back to the center?
  8. Once the coding (40168) was accepted, it's time for the final step. Click on Basic settings (04). Select group 001 and press GO!. This simple action of just accessing that channel will commence the calibration and, in a second or two, you should get reading from the group 001 telling you that the calibration was successful.
  9. Read the fault codes. There should be none.
  10. Close the controller. Turn off the car. Unplug VCDS.
  11. Start the car. All the warnings should be gone. You're done!


I can assure you it did not go that smoothly the first time. There are lots of confusing instructions in the net. The important thing is, that you will need to complete the whole procedure at once. If you mistype anything or if any code is rejected at any time, you will need to start again from step one.

This ends my report on the retrofit. Hope this is of use to someone. Best of luck with your project!

Jouko
 

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Wow - you are like my Physician - very knowledgeable - but unlike my Physician you now have WARM HANDS! :p
 

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Some additional information, to compliment Jouko's excellent write-up above:

The existing discussion Retrofitting Paddle Shifters to a Phaeton provides an illustrated guide explaining how to remove the airbag from the center of the steering wheel (an essential prerequisite to removing the steering wheel itself). This is not inherently difficult, but it needs to be done with care and can only be done one way. I recommend that anyone planning to remove a steering wheel read that discussion.

Based on my personal experience, I recommend that both batteries be disconnected before any wiring connections that have anything to do with the airbag system (this means any yellow-coloured wires and connectors you might find in the car) are disconnected. The primary reason why I recommend you disconnect both batteries is to prevent the airbag controller from recording any fault codes - if there is no power on the car, it is not possible for any controller to record a fault as a result of a break in a wiring circuit. This suggestion is based on the "simplify your life" school of thought, because some airbag system fault codes require a rather complex reset procedure to clear them, something that normally can only be done using a VAS 5051 or 5052 diagnostic scan tool.

The second reason why I suggest you disconnect all power before breaking any circuit in the airbag system is safety. Having both batteries disconnected reduces the risk of accidental discharge of an airbag. Note that when you disconnect the batteries for this purpose, you should disconnect the negative (ground) terminals, not the positive (+12 volt DC) terminals.

Coding for the steering wheel controller itself is quite straightforward. The code has a 2 in the third position from the right if the steering wheel is heated, and a 0 in that position if the steering wheel is not heated. By exception, it could be coded with a 1 if steering wheel heat is fitted but intentionally disabled, although this would be quite rare. Search for the VAG-COM label file '3D0-953-549.lbl' in the Ross-Tech folder at the root level of your hard drive, open that file with a text reader (notepad, etc.) and you can read all about coding and MVBs for the steering wheel controller.

Jouko makes reference above to the 'FIS' display, by this he means the small LCD display between the speedometer and the tachometer in the instrument cluster. This is also known as the Y24 display.

Somewhere in our forum there is a write-up about how to retrofit a wood steering wheel to a Phaeton that was originally equipped with a leather covered heated steering wheel. I did this to my car about 5 years ago. I can't find that post right now - if someone knows where it is, let me know and I will re-host pictures (if needed) and bring it up to date. That post will contain additional background information that might be useful for someone undertaking the heated steering wheel retrofit (which is basically the same task, in the opposite direction).

Finally, here is a link to a tangentially related discussion about steering wheels. This discussion addresses mechanical damage to a wire harness at the base of the steering wheel that can be caused by careless removal and replacement of a plastic cover above the accelerator and brake pedals in the driver footwell. It doesn't speak directly to this project, but might be worth reading before undertaking this project, simply to ensure you have a very well-rounded comprehension of steering wheel electronics. The link is Steering Fault - Workshop" message - here's the cause and the solution.

Michael
 

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Jouko:
Amazing research and post. I'll agree that it is interesting how so many Touareg/Phaeton parts are the same, and yet VW elected to carry two inventories for such a long time.

On another post, I just documented how a certain piece is the same for Phaeton, Touareg, Passat, five Audis, etc... and yet VW stamped nineteen different equivalent part numbers of the same piece.
 

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Hi all,
I am considering to carry out this project.
I have found a complete slip ring/stalks/controller assembly from a 2005 Touareg at a very good price. I have been researching a little and believe that the parts should fit my 2008 Phaeton. However I have a few doubts and was wondering if someone could give me a hand with them.
My current controller is 7L6953549K (software version 3601). The equivalent controller for a heated steering wheel is 7L6953549L. The Touareg controller is 7L6953549E (software version 3301), taking into account that it has been superseeded by the J, G and L suffixes I was wondering if I could get into trouble when connecting this "old" controller with the newer controllers from my 2008 Phaeton.
Many thanks in advance.

Gabriel
 

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I just re-read Jouko's superb explanation (above) of how to retrofit a heated steering wheel, and a few more thoughts came to my mind - so here are a few post-scripts to help anyone planning to do this modification in the future:

...Be very careful when loosening the airbag from the wheel. There are holes where you insert a screwdriver. You should NOT mess around with the screwdriver inside the steering wheel. The screwdriver needs to be twisted into the right direction to "click" the airbag free. Do observe VW service manual's instructions when doing this!
I wrote a post some years ago that has photos showing how to release the airbag in the middle of the steering wheel from the steering wheel. If a person has seen the inside of the steering wheel and the forward face (when installed) of the airbag, it is a simple task. But, if a person has never seen how the two parts lock to each other, it is impossible to visualize it, and although the repair manual instructions attempt to explain the process, it is really something that you need to be taught, in the sense of having another person show you the technique first. Here's the link to the post with pictures showing how to get the steering wheel airbag out:

Retrofitting a 6 button Cruise Control Switch

Below are a few photos from that discussion. You have to start the process with the steering wheel 'upside down' (rotated 180° from straight ahead).


Insert either a special airbag removal tool, or, a flat screwdriver with a wide blade and a short handle.


The following photos show what you are trying to accomplish with the screwdriver when you remove the airbag.









...DO NOT mess with the slip ring! When you remove the steering wheel, the slip ring "locks" into the last position. You can not turn it (and never should!) unless you press in the little stud facing the back of the steering wheel.
I second your warning to not ever touch the slip ring. In particular, don't ever touch that little stud that points out (towards the back of the car) after you have removed the steering wheel. If you press it, it will 'unlock' and spring aft out of the slip ring, and if there is no steering wheel in place to stop it, it will shoot right out and end up either in your face or somewhere in the back seat. It is extremely difficult to put that stud back in again!

Coding the new controller is explained by the VCDS coding helper (Michael: result of your work, I suppose?).
Correct, I wrote that coding helper file way back in 2005, I think.

You need to change just one bit from the original coding to enable steering wheel heat.
That is correct presuming that you have not changed the steering wheel controller. In other words, a Phaeton with steering wheel heat will have a '2' in the third position from the right (xxx2xx), and a Phaeton without steering wheel heat will have a zero in that position (xxx0xx). BUT... if you have installed a new steering wheel controller, especially if it is a used controller from another similar vehicle (Touareg, Bentley, etc.), you might have to change a whole bunch of numbers.

It is very easy to view the entire VAG-COM (VCDS) 'coding helper file' that is supplied for each controller. Just open the label file with a word processor (Notepad or similar). In fact, if you have the controller open within VAG-COM, you can click on the name of the label file - it is displayed at the top of the first screen you see when you open a controller - and VAG-COM will open the label file for you. Then you can see all the possible coding variations, and also read any embedded notes that the person who wrote the label file may have included.
 

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I was wondering if I could get into trouble when connecting this "old" controller with the newer controllers from my 2008 Phaeton.
Hi Gabriel:

I can't give you a definitive answer, but I think that you are at a 'higher than normal' risk of encountering problems because there was a major change in the Phaeton (and presumably Touareg) CAN bus architecture between 2005 and 2008. I believe that the change cut in with the MY 2007 Phaetons.

Broadly speaking, the MY 2003 to 2006 (inclusive) Phaetons are all the same, and with only a few exceptions, parts can be swapped freely between those model years. 2007 brought the introduction of the second phase of Phaetons (I think it was referred to as 'GP 1' internally), and there has since been a third generation introduced. Note that I am not talking about exterior trim differences, I am talking about significant electronic differences.

Michael
 

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Retrofitting accomplished!

Hi all,
Following Jouko's post I have managed to retrofit a heated steering wheel to my Phaeton.
I purchased the following parts from ebay:
- Brown heated steering wheel: part # 3D0 419 091 T 2N1.
- Steering wheel controller: part # 7L6 953 549 L.
- Spiral ring: part # 8E0 953 541 E.
The steering wheel controller and the spiral ring came in a complete set together with the stalks. Later on I discovered that the high beams were not working due to a damaged stalk...
Anyway, the installation was quite straight forward however lots of faults showed up in the subsequent first scan. Most of them were related to the ABS controller and to the fact that the steering wheel had been removed and also an airbag related fault.
Recoding the steering wheel controller was a piece of cake. It was originally coded to 001222 and I recoded it to 000211 (I guess that the original code included a 1 because the donor car featured the lane assist option and the indicator stalk had a button on the end to activate it). Coding the ABS was quite easy too, so was the steering angle sensor calibration.
Nevertheless there was an airbag fault that stated "00588 - Airbag Igniter; Driver Side (N95) 002 - Lower Limit Exceeded - MIL ON" that no matter what I did, it did not want to go. At that point I thought that I had f..... it up :banghead:. I had a look at the internet and found a post in which a guy mentioned that he had had the same fault on his car and it was only due to an airbag connector that connects at the rear of the controll module that once it is removed it is almost impossible to fix it in possition due to a very small locking tab that damages upon removal of the connector... :mad: So I had to remove the steering wheel column upper cover to gain access to that connector and found out that, what the guy said was actually happening to me. Well, I sorted it out with a thin tie wrap that locked the airbag connector in possition. After that I scanned the airbag controller, erase the old fault and fortunately it did not come back.
At that point I thought that the job was done, I collected all the tools, cleaned the new steering wheel and decided to test the heated steering wheel as a proud owner who had successfully accomplished the retrofit. Well, to my dismay, all the steering wheel controls operated correctly but the high beams... it would flash the lights but the high beam was not working :banghead: (also my all in one beloved wife, speed limiter, navigator and radar detector was :mad: as it was past ten o'clock in the evening, I had not had dinner, it was snowing, etc, etc).
I decided to reinstall my original stalks as it was the easiest thing to try, so I took all the bits and bobs apart, assembled the original stalks, reinstalled all the parts, repeated the coding process, calibrated the steering wheel angle sensor, and this this time everything operated correctly :). I tell you, I was quite relieved!!!

Gabriel
 

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Hi Gabriel:

Glad to hear everything worked out OK.

I know that tab you are talking about - it is very easy to break it when removing the airbag. My guess is that it was the one that the lower arrow is pointing to in the last photo above.

Michael

PS: I thought it was warm all the time in Spain... :confused:
 

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Hi Michael,
The steering wheel, I mean the heated steering wheel (I have to get used to name it properly now ;)), is working like a charm!
Actually the tab I meant was not the small black plug that connects the blue wires onto the rear of the airbag unit, but a yellow four pin plug that connects at the back of the steering wheel controller, on the right hand side, next to the paddle shifter connector. The locking tab has a very small upstand to lock it in position and I damaged it slightly when I first removed it, therefore the plug did not remain fully inserted into its receptacle and that caused the airbag fault.
With regards to the small black plug with the blue wires, once I connected it, I could not manage to find out how to disconnect it... Any idea?
About the Spanish weather, I have to say that there is a general misconception. The mediterranean coast is quite mild and sunny most of the year, although it can get rainy at times. However the northern and central regions are cold in winter, obviously not as cold as Canada, but we get a fairly amount of snow every winter and temperatures as low as -15ºC are not as uncommon. Also, these days due to your Polar Plunge & Vortex, we are experiencing every other day a series of Explosive Cyclogenesis :eek: that in the town where I live at 1200m above the sea level result in a nice snowy scenery. I guess that those Explosive Cyclogenesis are the culprits of the massive floodings in the UK though.

Gabriel

P.S. The heated steering wheel icon does not appear on the left of the display, but on the top mid section.
 

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Hi Michael , and everyone else reading this post....

I havve a 2006 3.0tdi touareg,

Bought the heated steering wheel , and fitted it yesterday..... no problem

My slipring has pins in the connector for heating wires.... but i have the 7l6 953 549 D control module......

Can I code the car to have the heating work?
or do I have to get another control module? Will the 7L6 953 549 J work?

I had the steering wheel professionally made into a sportier look, how do I post pictures? so I can show you....

Thank you

Touareik
 

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Hi Tuareik,
Unfortunately your current control module is not suitable for the heated steering wheel. You have to purchase one which suffix is either E, or J, or G. The modules that cannot operate a heated steering wheel are those with suffix either D, or H or F.
With regards on how to post pictures have a look here.
I hope it helps.

Gabriel
 

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Hi
Thank you , for Tour answer.
Bought the controlmodule on ebay today.
Comeback With paddle shifters as well.
So one more projekt to install....
I'll keeper you posted.
Will probably need a little more help, once I start coding
Have a Nice weekend
 

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Hi Eik:

The electronics of the MY 2003 to 2006 Touaregs are very similar to the Phaetons of the same model year. But, there are a few small differences - the differences are not bit enough to be readily noticable, but there are enough of them to cause problems if you follow Phaeton-specific instructions for a Touareg refit.

Best suggestion I can offer is that you have a look in some of the Touareg forums to see if there is any guidance there for your two projects (the paddle shifters and the heated wheel), then come back here to our forum for more 'general' instructions on how to accomplish these retrofits. The Touareg forum here on VW Vortex is not too active. You might want to consider looking at the Touareg forum on motor-talk.de (a German language forum), and also the various 'how-to' sub-forums on ClubTouareg.com, which is an English language forum based out of the USA. The ClubTouareg forum will probably have more retrofit information than motor-talk, but keep in mind that the Touaregs built for the North American market may be fractionally different than your European specification vehicle.

Keep us posted, you are always welcome here.

Michael
 

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Hi Eik:

The electronics of the MY 2003 to 2006 Touaregs are very similar to the Phaetons of the same model year. But, there are a few small differences - the differences are not bit enough to be readily noticable, but there are enough of them to cause problems if you follow Phaeton-specific instructions for a Touareg refit.

Best suggestion I can offer is that you have a look in some of the Touareg forums to see if there is any guidance there for your two projects (the paddle shifters and the heated wheel), then come back here to our forum for more 'general' instructions on how to accomplish these retrofits. The Touareg forum here on VW Vortex is not too active. You might want to consider looking at the Touareg forum on motor-talk.de (a German language forum), and also the various 'how-to' sub-forums on ClubTouareg.com, which is an English language forum based out of the USA. The ClubTouareg forum will probably have more retrofit information than motor-talk, but keep in mind that the Touaregs built for the North American market may be fractionally different than your European specification vehicle.

Keep us posted, you are always welcome here.

Michael
Sadly it looks like i can't do this on my Touareg. I have the module, 7L6953549G for lane assist and ACC, and looking at the VW site it doesn't show that the version G will work for heated wheel. I already bought the new clock spring part and i guess i should have continued researching. I almost bought the wheel but then saw only version E or L will work for heated wheels. Anyone else have any insight if G will support it??
 

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Hi James,

I can't help with any personal experience, but according to the documentation there are four threads of part numbers for this module on the Touareg which go like this:

7L6 953 549B dropped 1/3/04
7L6 953 549D dropped 1/3/06
7L6 953 549H dropped 1/1/08
7L6 953 549F (current)

7L6 953 549C dropped 1/4/04
7L6 953 549E dropped 1/5/07
7L6 953 549J dropped 1/5/07
7L6 953 549G (current)

7L6 953 549K (current)

7L6 953 549L (current)


Also according to the documentation, part 7L6 953 549G is for these applications:



I don't know if these three applications are mutually exclusive. Is that the problem?

Chris
 

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James,
The control module that I retrofitted to my Phaeton was 7L6 953 549 L. When I purchased it was originally coded 01222 which AFAIK standed for:
1: Lane assist.
2: Heated steering wheel via steering wheel button.
2: Multi-Function Steering Wheel (High) with 6 Buttons (CCS/ACC) installed.
2: Steering Column Adjustment installed.
Hence I would think that this module would also be suited for your Touareg.
In any case, removing and installing the control module is fairly easy, so if your G module does not work you can always replace it later on.
I hope it helps.

Gabriel
 
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