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^ yeah, grading and downspout extensions will help, but if it's odler construction and the pad has no vapor barrier and the walls are exposed cinderblock, it's still going to be moist AF.

One other thing, since I forgot it in my original suggestion (moisture stop the floor), if you see water ACTIVELY dripping into the garage from the wall, use some hydraulic cement and a trowel to plug it up, then cover everything with some moisture barrier paint; I used a 5 gallon jug of DryLok Extreme cinder block paint. Get the biggest, stiffest ( ;) ) brush you can, it's a workout to put that stuff on since it's like syrup.

Up to you, I know you said it's not your garage but $150-200 in materials and a weekend will make it a LOT nicer place to be, and protect your investment. Talk to your landlord, they may even reimburse you for materials. I had an apartment like that once, the first few months I barely paid any rent since I was just fixing everything. When I left that place, they jacked up the monthly rent payment since it was so much nicer; they got free labor, I got a nicer place to live, win win
ohhhh wow I should really read the whole thing I thought this was his parents house or something.

Yeah so I'd get a car cover and call that garage lost space, personally, and bug the landlord to look at it! Even grading and gutters cost more money then you as a renter are willing to shell out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·


I swept all that water after talking to the person whom overlooks the building. They're bringing someone in to tar a large portion of where the water seeps in when it rains. Still want a good undercoating for the underbody and the fenders all around. I was also thinking of a metal x-ray to look into the body and fenders. Has anyone got an idea of a place that provides that type of service?
 

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Are you saying you want to store your car in that garage with standing water? Because if you are you're committed to rusting your car out.

You want the concrete to look 100% dry or you don't want to store it in there, you need to monitor the humidity levels and you definitely want it under 50%.
 

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Tar will not work. If it's below grade, you need to what you can on the surface first, grading and gutter extensions. Get the water away from the foundation, as far as you can.

Water pressure will go right around a tar plug, that will not work. You have to use hydraulic cement, it can be applied even if the concrete is wet. Scrape where it is comign in with a wire brush, hose/rinse it off so there is not any mud/dirt, and mix up some hydraulic cement in a 5 gallon bucket, smash it in there with a trowel or whatever you want. That stuff will set even when wet and is your best bet against stopping intrusion.

Do not put that car in there until you do this.
 

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If that's coming through the floor then a sump pump is the only thing that's going to fix it unless you can get all of the water away from the house (unlikely), but I'd recommend a perimeter drain that goes to the sump pump basin, too. I doubt that the landlord will want to pay for that, but a dehumidifier is an exercise in frustration with that much water coming in. :(

It will make the whole house better. If it were your house it'd be the only way to go, but in a rental... :confused:
 

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If that's in a rental, I'd be looking for a new place to live.
 
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