VW Vortex - Volkswagen Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been running w/o powersteering(using a short belt,bypassing the pully)for about 3 weeks now, and i don't think that it's that bad. I feel a small diff. in performance,but every bit counts. What my concern is the rack, and the affect on it wile driving w/ a short belt, if any. I can feel that i'm fighting agains fluid, and wonder if i'm gonna burn it up or sumthin. maybe i'm crazy, and a bit worried.

By the way thanx TYROLKID for the part # autozone had it in stock when i finally found one http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Re: Short belt(power steering)bypass question (ANT THE KNEE)

Ant, I had this mod on my 2000 Celica GTS and I did it by taking the vanes out of the PS pump. I'm kinda surprised that you can run a shorter belt and still keep everything else happy. I hope you're getting enough tension or contact region with all the other pulleys...
Anyways, I did a lot of research at the time coz I had the same worries as you do. I dug around and discovered how the valving works. Results are:
1) The teeth of the rack & pinion will experience more wear. When the steering is boosted, the teeth are barely used to transmit any torque because pressurized hydraulic fluid acts on either side of a sealed portion of the rack, in order to piston it from side to side. You will no longer have hydraulic assist so the rack & pinion will transmit rotary motion from your steering column into linear motion of the rack to make the rack move. This will mean more wear on the teeth, and also more twist thru the steering column. I would not worry about this as I took apart a Ford PS system from work and everything looked robust enough--probably for safety in case the PS pump failed and someone still chose to drive it thus for an indefinite length of time.
2) There is what is called a powersteering hydraulic control valve. This is inline with your steering column and is basically a break in the shaft going from your steering wheel to the pinion. At this "break" the column necks down to like a 1/8" diameter rod which easily twists. When it twists (due to you applying steering), it allows orifices to line up and flow pressurized hydraulic fluid to the appropriate side the steering rack "piston" that I described above. At first I thought this tiny 1/8" dia rod might get twisted off if asked to transmit the full torque of me at the steering wheel. In taking apart the Ford unit, I discovered very robust overtravel "stops", and am no longer worried about that. Again it appears sized to last even without power assist.
But here is the main downside to our mod: There is about 10 degrees of total play in that control valve before the hard stops engage and allow direct transmission of your muscle thru the steering column. That sux, but is unavoidable in a former-power-assisted rack. A true manual rack (like in an old base Civic) would have a solid steering column but we suffer this control-valve mechanism which sticks that 10 deg. of play right into the steering column. Have you noticed that when you're driving along that a quick flick of the steering does not produce the quick dart of the car the way it used to? This is why, the control-valve ignores the first 5 degress or so of rotation of the wheel. Really ****ty it really bugged me that my car was compromised in this fashion.

When the PS system is running normally, you would rarely get to reach those hard-stops because by the time you got the control valve to twist say 4 degrees, the valve would be fully open and channelling a bunch of hydraulic oil to the rack, making the rack piston go. Basically the fluid would move the rack "ahead" of your inputs, or at least ahead of you putting enough force to get past 5 degrees and into the hard stops...
Well there's the deal. Theoretically you eliminate about 5hp worth of parasitic loss by disabling the PS, and you get a more direct feel.
I had this mod on my 93 Civic Si hatch and it was nice. But that car was 2350lbs with 185 tires and a slow (easier) steering ratio.
On my Celica which weighed about 2550 lbs with sticky 205 tires and a faster steering ratio it was a handful, probably twice the effort of the Civic, but still kinda manageable.
On my 2900 lb GTi with 225 tires and a still quick ratio, it is virtually impossible. (I've tested this by turning off the ignition while rolling--but don't take the key out or the column could lock)
I don't know how you steer with it that heavy Ant, and I'm sorry to say it, but I think you're compromising the safety of your car too much...
Best regards,
P.S. If you want to get rid of the fluid squishing around you can do so by disconnecting the appropriate line, and turning the wheel back and forth while the PS fluid squirts out. Hopefully some will be left to lubricate the rack teeth.
But don't disconnect and PLUG the 3 holes coz you'll be left with a frozen (hydraulically locked) steering system. Don't ask how I know, hehe...



[Modified by Steve Won, 8:13 PM 11-26-2001]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: Short belt(power steering)bypass question (wolfsburg2)

it's a 40" 6 rib surpantine belt, i hope that it helps
400k6 is what i bought


[Modified by ANT THE KNEE, 5:14 PM 11-27-2001]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Re: Short belt(power steering)bypass question (ANT THE KNEE)

Good info Steve Won. Did you ever consider replacing the rack with a true manual rack? You think safety or
I guess this would be impossible in my Passat(~3050lbs)? I considered it, but my friends said I was crazy.
5hp isn't much, but I could get rid of the weight of the power steering pump as well, and I would think this would complement something like an underdrive pulley very well. Also, might increase my fuel mileage by a few MPG.
-Ian
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top