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Re: BACK FROM THE DEAD - IT'S THE FAQ BEETLE THREAD!! (dl337)

Just to add to your wonderful instructions. Don't open your coolant bottle. I made that mistake and all the coolant up to the level of the coolant temp hose drained out. DOH!
 

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Sway Bar Bushing Replacement

Sway Bar Bushing Replacement
If you are hearing any noise from the front of you car over bumps, or are simply looking to perform some maintanance on a high mileage bug, your sway bar bushings are probably in need of replacement. With 125k on my odometer I decided to swap mine out for a set of prothane sway bar bushings.
If you just want a replacement and will not be under your car enough to watch and relubricate the bushings, i recommend purchasing a set of OEM sway bar bushings. Be sure to have your VIN handy as VW changed both the diameter of the sway bar and the style of bushing/ bracket over time.

Tools Needed
- Jack and Jack Stands
- 13 mm socket
- 16 mm socket -or- box wrench
Procedure
- Raise both front wheels off the ground and place on jack stands. Make sure you use jack stands as you do not want your car coming down on top of you. Make sure to use the proper jack points for both raising the car and placing it on the stands.
- Remove both front wheels from the car.
- Pick a side to work on and turn the steering wheel toward that side of the car. So if you want to work on the passenger side front, turn the steering wheel all the way to the right. This will move the inner tie-rod boot out of the way and give you enough rough to work on the bushings.
- Remove the sway bar end link where at attaches to the lower control arm. This is a 16mm bolt holding the lower link into the control arm. Once the bolt is removed simply swing the end link up and out of the way.

- You will find the sway bar bushing above the back side of the control arm in front of the accordion boot for the inner tie rod end.
- On top of the bracket holding the boshing is a 13 mm bolt. This can be removed using a socket or a box wrench. There is not much room to work in, but with the tie rod pulled into the steering rack you will have enough room to remove the bolt as well as remove the bracket.

- The bottom of the bracket has a hook on it that loops into the subframe. With the 13mm bolt removed you should be able to wiggle the sway bar itself. By shifting the bar around you will loosen the bracket and can then rotate the top of the bracket away from the bolt hole. With the top rotated toward the rear of the car and the sway bar raised in the air, you should be able to "unhook" the bracket.
- This image shows you how the bracket looks off the car and you can see how the hook works.

- Once the bracket is removed from the car you can pull the bushing itself off of the bar. The bushing is split on the back side and is simply pulled apart and wrapped around the sway bar. Depending on how old/ how many miles you have the bushing will most likely be worn and will come off the bar fairly easily.
- In this pic you can see how the bar sits without the bushing/ bracket in. This should also give you an idea of what your working with the get the bushing and bracket back in.

- Reinstallation is simply the reverse of the above procedure. Make sure you use the provided grease/ lubricant or the bushings will creak and make noise over time. Since the bushings are new it make take a little strength to get the bracket back into place where you can thread the 13 mm bolt back into place. By wiggling the sway bar and shifting the bushing you will eventually get the bolt to thread into place.
- Repeat on opposite side of car.
- When finished, bolt the wheels back on, lower off the jack stands, take a nice drive and enjoy a cold


Extras[
- In this pic you can see the difference between the old bushing (left) and the new bushing (right). The OEM bushing was worn and the center hole for the sway bar was enlarged quite a bit allowing the bar to shift around.



Modified by bugasm99 at 10:54 PM 3-28-2007
 

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Re: Sway Bar Bushing Replacement (bugasm99)

1.8T PCV "Y" hose replacement:

The Y shaped PCV hose on the 1.8T engine is prone to becoming soft and splitting open after a time. There are two revisions of the hose, an early and a late production hose. Both are overpriced for what they are, but the earlier hose is around $20 to $30 more than the later one. The later hose, along with being cheaper, is molded different and slightly thicker at the split where the hose is prone to break.
The later hose WILL FIT THE EARLIER CARS. The primary fitment difference between the two is the later hose is slightly too large for the outlet on the valve cover. However, a standard hose clamp will squeeze the hose down nicely. So, a 20 cent clamp saves you 20 dollars, and you get a better hose than the original as a bonus.
Another little known fact is that that same hose is usually cheaper from an Audi delarship than from a VW dealership. Just tell them you need that hose for an '03 Audi 180hp TT.
 

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Wheel / Tire Example Thread for the New Beetle

Here is a link to my wheel tire example thread which shows different wheel sizes and offsets that will fit on the beetle and how they will look.
http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3101294
 

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I have a 2002 VW New Beetle and the trunk lid won't open. The remote will open the doors, but not the trunk lid. The button on the inside driver's door doesn't open it either. It does not have a lock on the lid to insert a key. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I don't want to have to pay a dealer a lot of $$'s plus an arm and leg.
 

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Re: (Buffycat242)

Quote, originally posted by Buffycat242 »
I have a 2002 VW New Beetle and the trunk lid won't open. The remote will open the doors, but not the trunk lid. The button on the inside driver's door doesn't open it either. It does not have a lock on the lid to insert a key. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I don't want to have to pay a dealer a lot of $$'s plus an arm and leg.

Fold a back seat half down and grab the red emergency, "in case you lock yourself in the trunk" handle. That'll get it open when you have to get in. Or out
 

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Retrofitting cruise control to 2.0 AVH (drive-by-wire) NBs

IMPORTANT FOREWORD: This writeup is incomplete. My mechanical-engineer father-in-law and I have done the homework, cross-checked wiring diagrams, torn down the dashboard to see what we're working with, etc. However, one of the harnesses you need to access to do this job is nearly inaccessible, and we haven't figured out how to get to it. But I offer this information anyway, because I don't think there's any other similar writeups out there — and an incomplete writeup is better than none. As always, tear into your own car at your own risk.
ADDING CRUISE CONTROL TO 2.0 AVH (and, I suspect, any other drive-by-wire NB — but don't quote me on that)
The Overview: You buy a kit that has the turn-signal stalk with cruise switches, plus a wire harness to mate it into your car. You pop one lead out of the back of your fusebox, and substitute one of the leads on the new harness. (The lead you removed gets piggybacked onto the new lead.) Then, you pop the other four leads of the new harness into a black 10-pin connector way under your dashboard. Finally run the other end of that harness up the steering column, pop off the steering wheel, pop on the new turn-signal stalk, and reassemble. Flash the ECU to recognize that the cruise function is there, and enjoy.
The Specifics: The "overview" makes the job sound easier than it is, but here's what I've figured out.
1. Buy Volkswagen special tool VAS 1978/4 (or better, try to get a generic equivalent through your friendly neighborhood auto-parts store so you don't pay out the nose). This is the tool to effortlessly remove that lead from your fusebox. Especially at roughly $5 for the generic tool, it's well worth it to save hassle and potential damage.
2. Go to your dealer (or 1stVWParts.com, or TMTuning, etc.) and order part 1J0 998 527 A. It'll show up as being a cruise-control kit for Golf/Jetta TDI — but the parts are right; it just means you'll get the wrong installation manual (hence this writeup). The kit is the cruise-equipped turn signal stalk, plus a wiring harness with five flying leads at one end and a small 10-pin plug on the other. (The small plug goes into the stalk; the flying leads get grafted into the car.)
3. Look over the Golf/Jetta instructions included with the kit — you need to do the same thing on your NB, but the stuff is in different locations. Fortunately, the wiring stuff all matches up.
(a) Just like on Golf/Jetta, you need to install the black/blue lead into the back of Fuse 5. This is where the special tool above is worth its weight in gold. (Do as I say and not as I did — save yourself the headache and buy the bleepin' tool.)
(b) The other four leads (which get added into blank locations on a large black 10-pin connector already in the car) are labeled [1], [2], [3], and [9]. Though intended for G/J TDI, those are also the correct pin numbers for an NB 2.0.
4. Start digging into the car:
(a) Disconnect your battery. You'll be removing the airbag, which involves explosives. Don't mess with it until leaving the battery disconnected for 30 minutes — unless you like losing fingers, getting phosphorous burns, etc. Plus, you need power disconnected to safely muck around with the back side of the fuse panel, too.
(b) Using Torx T-20 and T-25 bits, remove the driver's-side lower dash cover. There's two screws under the center console near the hazard switch, way at the back. Also pop off the two trip pieces to the sides of those switches — there's two more screws back there. The rest of it is just looking for screws, removing them, and semi-carefully wiggling the plastic dash parts to pop them out of their spring clips. You'll figure it out as you go. Don't be unnecessarily brutal, but the plastic pieces are pretty sturdy — you'd have to be pretty ham-fisted to break them.
(c) Remove the end cover for the driver's side of the dash, where the door to the fuse panel is. It's all spring clips — just pry gently and pop it out.
(d) The fusebox is held in place with two Torx T-25s. Remove them; it'll give you more room to work with.
(e) Remove Fuse 5; then with the special tool, push the connector for the right side of that fuse out the back of the fusebox. Replace it with the black/blue lead from your new harness. Then, plug the old lead into the piggyback provision on the new harness. (Trust me; it's obvious when you have the parts in hand.)
5. Here's the step I'm missing. The connector where the other four leads need to go is under the dash, facing downward, way back near the firewall. Even with all the lower dash panels on the driver's side removed, you can barely see it -- and only by spotting the similar white and orange connectors in the same place. You can see it, but not reach it well enough to work with. Anybody who can supply info on how to get those connectors pulled up into an area where you can actually work with them will be my hero. But the good news is that if you can get at the connector, you just match the new harness's leads with the corresponding pin numbers on that harness.
6. Remove the airbag cover from the steering wheel. I assume the process is basically as outlined for Golf/Jetta, though I didn't get this far because of my hangup at Step 5. Once the airbag is out, removing the wheel is easy — just mark how it;s lined up BEFORE unbolting the wheel. Otherwise, it won't be aligned right when you put it back on. Once the wheel's off, you've got easy access to pull your old turn-signal stalk and put on the new one. Run the the tiny 10-pin connector from your new harness up the steering column and plug it into the back of the new cruise-equipped switch.
7. Bolt stuff back up.
8. To play it safe, have your dealer flash your ECU with the correct code to activate the cruise-control function — I can't vouch whether the 5-digit code listed in the factory instructions for TDI would be correct for any other engine.
Again, I know it's incomplete, but it's more info than was out there before. Hope it saves someone else a lot of this background work. And if anyone ever gets past the parts where I got hung up, please IM me so we can maybe clean up and simplify this write up.
Cheers!
 

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Re: Retrofitting cruise control to 2.0 AVH (drive-by-wire) NBs (OstTrefftWest)

Mr. TT,
Above you stated that a TDI midpipe can replace a midmuffler on a beetle. Are these just turbo models or can I use the TDI midpipe on my 2.0 8v ? Not familar with this and you have me interested as my car needs some exhaust work after the 150,000 miles I have racked up. Thanks for your feed back in advance.
 

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Re: (post-it-note-killer)

Quote, originally posted by post-it-note-killer »
Would anyone happen to know how many Double Yellow beetles were produced in 2002?

this was forever ago but VWoA told us that there were 2000 of all of the CC beetles made for each color
 

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Re: The Official New Beetle/New Beetle Convertible D.I.Y./FAQ Thread (The Ninja)

Great picture with Part Numbers of The 1.8t NB Vacuum Lines:

Key thing to note: The N249 & N112 valves have new part numbers as per VW. Original part number is 028906283N newer part number is 06A906283F
These following pictures show where to place a MBC and show the vacuum components. These are compliments of member zeusenergy http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif


 

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Re: The Official New Beetle/New Beetle Convertible D.I.Y./FAQ Thread (sledge0001)

Quote, originally posted by sledge0001 »
Great picture with Part Numbers of The 1.8t NB Vacuum Lines:
These following pictures show where to place a MBC and show the vacuum components. These are compliments of member zeusenergy http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif

Thanks for posting those! I've got a ton of info compiled, so take a deep breath, 18 pages comin at ya
 

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Re: The Official New Beetle/New Beetle Convertible D.I.Y./FAQ Thread (zeusenergy)

*Zeusenergy's Guide to the 1.8T New Beetle Engine and Related Systems*

Intro:
Since February 2008, I have had my 2001 New Beetle Sport 1.8T. I loved the car when it was stock. But there was also plenty of room to modify the car to many new levels. I chose the car due to the following priorities:
1)Price- GTI's are MUCH more costly with the same miles and condition.
2)availability- New Beetles are constantly passed over for the "hotter" GTI/Golf/Jetta.
3)Desire for a 2-door sport coupe- the other choice was a Passat B5, and that's not a coupe!
4)MUST HAVE 1.8T. It's powerful, reliable, and economical plus a huge aftermarket.
5)I just like the NB over the MK4's anyway!
So now that I have the car, what to do? Discover what makes it tick, of course. Over six months time, I lurked in the forums online and found out everything I needed to know to try messin' with the car. And in only a couple months, I went from the stock 8 PSI to 16 PSI with a MBC/diode, to dual MBC's, and finally to the current (7/08) setup with the N75 and WOT operated single MBC. Now I have 10 PSI continuous, and 14 PSI at full throttle. There are ZERO limp mode troubles and everything works just like stock, except the added performance especially at WOT. All of my modifications were done under the watchful eye of a boost gauge in my dash. And these modifications led me to learn much more about the 1.8T than most people will ever have to. Of course, I'm not running any big turbo package or anything. So I have not torn down the engine (YET!) I do plan to chip the car at some point, probably during Waterfest 2009.
If you are reading this info, then obviously you are here for the lowdown on the 1.8T and its operation. Or... you are here to try and discredit the information within, nitpicking and arguing. If it's the latter, then please make sure you have your facts straight. First off, this is a NEW BEETLE we are talking about, not a MK4. There are many differences between the 1.8T in both types of car. And of course, my car will differ from some of the NB's out there too, with regard to what it will or will not handle. We all know after being around these VAGs that two cars off the same production line CAN and DO differ.
Also, this is not an end-all single document that will tell yo everything under the sun. I think I've compiled an appropriate range of subjects and enough information for FAQ status, adding to what has already been said or just clarifying basics for the novice.
So back to the subject. The 1.8T engine in the 2001 sport is called AWV. My car was built in May of 2001, making it a 2001.5 if you will. The transaxle in the car is a five speed manual 02J on my car. This car produces 150 HP stock at 8 PSI, which is supposedly understated by the factory... I have heard rumors that it was measured at the wheels. Either way, 150 HP is what it is. There is a NB "S" turbo model as well, and it produces 180HP stock, engine designation AWP. It is a retuned version of the AWV allowing for 12 PSI stock. Both of these engines run a "better" version of the KO3 turbo, sometimes called the KO3s. Physically the two engines are identical. Then there is the older version of the 1.8T carried in the NB, called the APH- also producing the same HP from the factory as the NB sport... 150 HP at 8 PSI. This older model (1999-early 2001) has a regular KO3 turbo, which is capable of less boost at higher RPM's than the KO3s and also has a smaller inlet for the compressor and smaller turbine (exhaust) side. Mine is a KO3-053 if I'm reading the tag correctly- which makes it the better one. The APH also has a different cylinder head from what I have heard.
All other differences are trivial and for the most part, the systems in all three engine codes are operated the same way. Any differences I have noted across the ranges will be discussed in each section. take note of the differences in the MK4 as discussed in each section as well- it may help you to diagnose problems or modify your car even though the real estate looks different between them. MK4 guys have much more to offer, as there are more of them and there are more DIY types than the average NB owner. with this info in hand you should be able to figure out what you need to look at when they discuss certain devices or systems that just don't live in your engine bay as they may show or describe. If you own a MK4, you may even get some info here that may help you.



Modified by zeusenergy at 7:24 AM 5-6-2009
 

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Re: The Official New Beetle/New Beetle Convertible D.I.Y./FAQ Thread (zeusenergy)

*Engine Basics- Block and cylinder Head, Mechanical and Lube/cooling*
The 1.8T is a five valve per cylinder engine. Three valves are for each cylinder to intake air, and the other two are devoted to exhaust purging. It has dual overhead cams with a single drive cog that is turned by a toothed timing belt. This belt also operates the water pump. A tensioner and idler pulley exist under the timing cover to adjust the tension of the belt, and assist it to make better contact area with the cam cog and crank cog. Any timing belt replacement should include water pump, tensioner, and idler as well as a full coolant changeout. A small drive gear on the crankshaft just under the timing cog and a flanged housing (containing the front main seal) drives the oil pump located directly below these items.
The exhaust cam is the belt driven one. the intake cam is attached to the exhaust cam by a chain at the rear of the cylinder head- driver side. this chain is either tensioned by a simple tensioner, or by an electrically operated variable timing mechanism (called the N205 camshaft adjustment valve: CAV or "VVT") that changes the relationship of the two cams, reducing the overlap or increasing it (the overlap is the time both intake and exhaust valves are open, between the exhaust and intake strokes of the motor.) The CAV is included in later model engines, I believe the APH has the simple tensioner. You can tell which is yours by looking at the driver side of the cam cover, just above where the upper radiator hose meets the motor, under the cam cover vent hose. There will be an electrical harness plugged into a small plug there if you have the CAV. The CAV is not for increased performance, it helps in reducing emissions from what I have heard. It also costs more to replace, and can fail as can the regular tensioner. Chain guides in this location can also fail, leading to a loud noise when no load is applied. A filter housing for oil is located near the rear of the motor between the radiator and motor side facing it. It has a fitting for PCV gases to escape the engine block, a fitting for the oil pressure sending unit, and an attached water-to-oil cooler to assist in warmups and temperature variations between coolant and oil. An additional fitting provides oil pressure to the turbo oil bearing. A small electric pump continues to pass coolant through the turbo housing after shutdown for a few minutes and it lives on the cooling fan plastic guard, near the oil dipstick and alternator. Additional coolant lines pass to the turbo around the back of the motor and they can fail or possibly rot out, especially near the front motor mount on the passenger side. coolant for this engine is labelled as G12 and is specific to the VAG range. If you use any other type, you may cause premature wear to the water pump in particular, and also the coolant passages and seals. If you know that your car has had any other type of coolant installed, please drain and flush, then refill as soon as possible. Short duration use of non-approved coolant may be fine, but only in an emergency situation. oil for this engine generally calls for full synthetic of varying weights. You may use regular conventional "dino" oil after the initial break-in period, but must change oil at 3000 mile intervals instead of the much higher intervals requested by VAG. Dino oil tends to coke up the oil bearing of the turbo and sludge the oil passages pretty quickly if you let it go too long, or shut your engine off right after a hard run. the best advice is to let your engine idle for a minute before shutdown in all cases. It will prolong the life of your engine and turbo!
There are two oil lines attached to the turbo. the input line comes from the oil filter housing, and the output line goes right into the oil pan. There is a large filter available for the 1.8T normally used in the Passat application. It will spin onto the filter housing just like the smaller one, and increases the oil capacity and filtering capability.
The water pump moves coolant through the block, to the head, and to the water flange at the back of the head. From there, a pipe is attached and the coolant temperature sensors are mounted to this piece, between the head and radiator upper tank. The coolant temp sensor (CTS) that fails often is the one closest to the head. It can be replaced with no tools except a simple pick or tiny screwdriver to get the clip off. Replacement of this part should be done with a cold engine, pull the overflow tank cap, replace it, then begin pulling the clip off the CTS towards the front of the car. The CTS should pop right out, and replacement should include a new rubber O-ring inside the hole the CTS came out of. Replace the clip, and all is good.
From the radiator lower tank, coolant goes to the thermostat located just between the alternator and block. It's a difficult removal due to the tight quarters, but can be done with care and the right tools without removing the alternator.
 

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Re: The Official New Beetle/New Beetle Convertible D.I.Y./FAQ Thread (zeusenergy)

*PCV System*
The PCV system on this engine is complex due to the fact it is boosted by a turbocharger, and compounded by the two different fittings that attaches to the internal passages. One of the passages is in the valve cover. The other is in the oil filter housing. These are hooked up to a pipe which has two possible ways of drawing foul air and gasses out of the engine: one is in the intake hose attached to the air filter (TIP), the other is attached to the intake manifold. Some 1.8T engines do not have the valve cover connection at all. This is especially true for older models of VAG, not necessarily in the NB. The models that do not have a valve cover connection take only crankcase fumes out, while the valve cover connection will assist in venting the top of the motor- which prevents the rising vapors from settling on the cams and valvetrain, and to relieve the pressure buildup in the valvetrain case. An additional feature of the PCV system is a one-way valve that prevents boost from the intake manifold from pushing pressurized charge air back into the crankcase. During the onboost times, a connection at the turbo intake pipe (TIP) will accomodate the vacuum needed to draw out the fumes from the block and head. Some of the VAG guys will use a "catch can" instead of the stock PCV system. A catch can can be vented directly to the atmosphere through a small filter at the top of the catch can, or that connection can be rerouted back into the intake like stock. The main reason for this modification is to reduce the amount of lines under the intake manifold and to get rid of the plastic and rubber connections that tend to crack open or break off entirely. Poor running conditions and possible stalls or low boost conditions can result from broken PCV lines.
These lines are quite expensive for what they are and not very reliable after a few years and many miles of use. If you wish to do a catch can mod, there is a few different methods available, but the main one most people follow is to vent back into the TIP like the stock method. This prevents odors from coming from the engine but it doesn't always prevent one of the main concerns: oil in the intake and hoses, and intercooler. Some catch cans do not have good baffling to capture and liquify the oil vapors. Also, you are burning nasty fumes in your motor, which isn't so good for it and also tends to lower performance ever so slightly. If you find oil inside of any of the intake lines, then your PCV system may be failing. There is a small round device attached to the TIP that all of the PCV hoses route to. This "UFO" (Pressure regulator Valve) as it is called traps oil vapors, and allows them to gravity feed back into the crankcase through the same lines. It can get clogged up and stop condensing the vapors, allowing them to form back into liquid after hitting the turbocharger. This makes the intercooler fill up with oil rather quickly, and might make you think that the turbo oil bearing is failing. These are the two basic reasons for oil in the intercooler, but the first thing to check is the UFO for failure. The throttle body can also get clogged with oil and it may harden in the bore due to this problem. That's why alot of VAG guys will tell you to do a throttle body cleaning. If you don't fix the problem, it will recur yearly, and can manifest some strange symptoms such as poor idle, reduced response, and overall poor performance. This condition may even make your TB fail entirely if left in this condition, and TB's are not cheap by any means.
 
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