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Does anyone have a thread on how to change a timing belt? :eek: I think I know how to do it but having instructions
just makes everything easier. I have a bentley however in that particular section, it's not step by step. I want to
make sure I am removing the correct pulleys and all...My cabby is a 91 Digifant. I screwed the timing up installing a new 270 cam and ate a few teeth on my belt putting it back together...LOL. I needed a new belt anyways...matter of fact all my belts need to be changed, and I need details!! The car has been sitting 3 weeks now waiting on me...:popcorn: Thanks in advance!!!!
 

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Here you go:
http://www.vintagewatercooleds.com/tech/Techtips/Timbotechnotes/timingbelt/timingbelt.htm

Big difference is that the tensioner usually does not have that big nut.....usually has the 2 small holes that requires a tensioner tool (or small allen wrench *hint hint*;)).

I am very surprised a timing belt change thread is not a bit more handy.:( vortex re-platform.

Other personal notes:
* BEFORE taking off the existing belt, set the engine to TDC and verify all timing marks on the car sprocket, flywheel and distributor. I set the TDC and then marked the old belt with a paint pen as a sanity check for the new belt. You still need to use the cam,flywheel,distributor marks since things move around as you install the new belt anyway.

* as you turn the engine, make sure you turn at the crank pulley bolt - do not use the cam sprocket bolt to turn the engine over once the belt is attached.

* Since you need to remove various pulleys to get the plastic lower outer cover off, you need to be very careful about seating the hex key wrench in the bolt fully. Clean it out before turning it to prevent stripping out the bolt head.

* Make sure you turn the tensioner the correct way when tightening it. Otherwise the lower cover won't go back on correctly and you have to tear it all apart again.

* I left my timing belt covers off since they made a lot of noise and I had been going in out of that area for other things. Much easier to work on, but obviously exposes the belt to the elements more.

* Hardest/longest part is getting the pulleys and covers off. An extra pair of hands helps when installing the timing belt itself, but can definitely be done by yourself.
 

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a good piece of advice that I read one time to make sure you get the new belt on without messing up your timing.

cut the old belt in half length wise before you take it off. Then just take off the outer half. The inner half keeps everything lined up until you get the new one started on then when it is about half way on cut the inner half of the old belt off. slide the new belt the rest of the way on and everything is line up.

I have never had to do this yet myself, but the next time I do a belt I'm going to try it.

Steve
 

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but what about the tensioner replacement? how would you do that without taking the belts off?
Impossible.

The closest you could get it if the timing belt covers weren't there, and even that will require getting the timing belt over the crankshaft pulley.....and you'd have to remove the other belts anyway.

Tensioner makes sense to replace while you are in there.

Other things to consider, but are optional based on time, money, recent work and laziness.......
- waterpump ; you already figured that out.
- oil seals on the camshaft, crankshaft, intermediate shaft
- replace any mangled pulley bolts
- align the pulleys.....check that the pulleys are perfectly in line, improves V-belt llife
- Passenger side engine mounts - this is that perfect moment to replace it.
- Associated coolant hoses.
 

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Just what I wanted to hear :)

I'm going to try to put together a shopping list. maybe you guys could help tweak it... that way when someone searches this thread, it'll be a package deal, and this thread could be the end all do all.
 

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Does this list look good and complete? I'm thinking that if this does become a searched thread, having it all spelled out would help people. I'm sure there are a lot of people who want to do the maintenance but don't know everything about it.

timing belt - $8.75
Tensioner Pulley - $15
water pump - $55
camshaft seal - $5.25

Crankshaft seals - do you need front and back... what about that seal housing? if only front one: $5 back one $18, seal housing $2
seal and o-ring: $7
passenger side motor mount - $15 but which one is it?

so that's around 125 plus shipping for all that... unless I'm wrong?
 

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I thought the camshaft seal also had an o-ring on the retainer plate.

For the crankshaft, you wouldn't be able to do the rear seal from this side of the engine anyway.

At the risk of veering off in a completely different direction, the waterpump replacement brings up the notion of replacing various coolant hoses.
The 3 way hose between the heater pipe, the oil cooler and the waterpump itself is easiest to replace when the waterpump is replaced.

It can be done with the pump mounted, but you will swear a lot more that way.

Other than that, I think you've got the makings of a part order list and a weekend's worth of work (at a leisurely pace - your results may vary).:thumbup:
 

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a good piece of advice that I read one time to make sure you get the new belt on without messing up your timing.

cut the old belt in half length wise before you take it off. Then just take off the outer half. The inner half keeps everything lined up until you get the new one started on then when it is about half way on cut the inner half of the old belt off. slide the new belt the rest of the way on and everything is line up.

I have never had to do this yet myself, but the next time I do a belt I'm going to try it.

Steve
ohhhhhh that is so good of an ideer, that I like it, I really really like it....
 

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I thought the camshaft seal also had an o-ring on the retainer plate.

For the crankshaft, you wouldn't be able to do the rear seal from this side of the engine anyway.

At the risk of veering off in a completely different direction, the waterpump replacement brings up the notion of replacing various coolant hoses.
The 3 way hose between the heater pipe, the oil cooler and the waterpump itself is easiest to replace when the waterpump is replaced.

It can be done with the pump mounted, but you will swear a lot more that way.

Other than that, I think you've got the makings of a part order list and a weekend's worth of work (at a leisurely pace - your results may vary).:thumbup:

Don't do the rear seal, and since it is a 92, you don't have the oil cooler on your car by OEM. It could of been a add-on, but dubious. So you don't have the one pastard hose and the two little ones either.

what is a oil cooler look like? It is on the bottom of the oil filter flange the oil filter screws in to it.

 

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I generally don't disagree with a lot of what is said on here, but I don't think a new water pump is a necessity. I am of the mind of "If it's not broke don't fix it." My water pump is still working fine and I replaced my timing belt about a year and 4,000 miles ago and haven't had a problem with the pump. However, if you do go for a new water pump stay away from the plastic impeller ones and go for the steel impeller pumps as they are much better. Also replacing non-leaky hoses is not a necessity, but in the name of preventative maintenance it isn't a completely bad idea.


Impossible.

The closest you could get it if the timing belt covers weren't there, and even that will require getting the timing belt over the crankshaft pulley.....and you'd have to remove the other belts anyway.

Tensioner makes sense to replace while you are in there.

Other things to consider, but are optional based on time, money, recent work and laziness.......
- waterpump ; you already figured that out.
- oil seals on the camshaft, crankshaft, intermediate shaft
- replace any mangled pulley bolts
- align the pulleys.....check that the pulleys are perfectly in line, improves V-belt llife
- Passenger side engine mounts - this is that perfect moment to replace it.
- Associated coolant hoses.
I have much respect for you, and your knowledge of Cabbys is far superior to mine. However about the tensioner: are you sure it can't be replaced without the timing belt being removed? I don't have my top timing belt cover on so maybe its a different story to some extent, but the tensioner is only held on by ONE bolt as seen in the pic below and its quite easy to replace (I have done it twice).




haha thanks man.

I was trying to find those hoses. no luck though. I'm quite the noob on this.
My experience has been with hoses that only your local VW Audi dealer can get those. If you can read the part number on the hose that will help out a lot. Be prepared to pay $$ for hoses. I just replaced a chafed oil breather hose. $35 at (with a mechanic friends discount) for a hose about six inches long.



Just trying to give the OP some various views so the he/she can make the decision that best fits his/her situation. Good luck regardless. :thumbup: :thumbup:
 

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My experience has been with hoses that only your local VW Audi dealer can get those. If you can read the part number on the hose that will help out a lot. Be prepared to pay $$ for hoses. I just replaced a chafed oil breather hose. $35 at (with a mechanic friends discount) for a hose about six inches long.
I too replaced that cute little hose a couple years back and had to go through the dealer.

However, almost all of the coolant system-related hoses can be found at germanautoparts.com, autohausaz.com, etc.

:beer:
 
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