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So I thought a thread about unusual, interesting, experimental, or rare military or government vehicles would be pretty nifty. Here are some of my favorites!
The Nodwell Track Truck:

Track Trucks used for parts (One is amphibious!)

The more common Tucker Snow Cat:


My favorite in the snow exploration category, the FWD Teracruzer 8-320B:



The Chrylser Cabover Four Wheel Drive. Only 2 prototypes were ever built. Designed for WWII but arrived too late. It could ford 65 inches of water!!

The amphibious LARC-60!


NASA's Chevy "Streamliner", of which only one was built. Designed to pull experimental aircraft into the air at high speeds.

 

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FV-QR


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One of the earliest applications was this three-roller Dodge Power Wagon. Ground pressure was drastically reduced due to the large ground area in contact with the bags, and the low air pressure (from 2.5 to 6 psi) in the bags. The man under the left rear bag does not appear to be in pain (or else his Army buddy in the cab is just a huge jerk -ed.). The vehicle weighed 9,500 pounds (vs. 5,500 for a normal Power Wagon), and was built by the West Coast Machinery Company of Stockton, California. It used a Chrysler 135 horsepower model IND-18A V-8 engine and a Powerflite torque converter. There was no suspension other than that provided by the low-pressure bags. Although this photo was taken at Sharpe General Depot in California in June 1953, the vehicles were actually tested in Greenland and at Aberdeen Proving Ground in May 1954.





And this is an explenation to the odd-wheeled jeep:
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This peculiar machine, seen here from the right rear, incorporated one of the strangest concepts ever tried on a wheeled vehicle. The idea was that if the ground pressure could be changed regularly as the wheel turns, and would do so in relation to the other wheels on the same and opposite side, increased traction would result. Four tires and wheels were specially built which were ellipsoidal in circumference, and they were mounted offset at 90 degrees on each side, as well as being offset right side to left side. A front axle with normal tires was used for steering.
This top view of the ellipsoidal-wheeled experimental vehicle shows the unusual configuration. Suspension was of a fabricated walking beam type, and chains drove the four rear wheels. The outer diameter of the inflated tire was approximately three inches greater across the widest section than across the narrowest. A T26E4 tracked snow tractor (Allis-Chalmer) was modified in 1946 to test the concept. It was a dismal failure in that it not only failed to provide better mobility, but operation over any but the softest soils pitched the operator around unmercifully. But the Army will try anything once.



Modified by czook at 1:36 PM 11-17-2009
 

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Re: FV-QR (OldsPowered)

Not many people may know this, but this is quite an interesting story:

The tires on BIGFOOT # 5 were originally used on a land train that was used by the US Military to drive over the Alaskan tundra in the 1950's. The huge tires also had numerous other uses, such as this huge "swamp buggy". The pictures below show some of these vehicles:
The Alaskan land train

There were a couple versions:


 

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Re: FV-QR (chucchinchilla)

Years ago when I worked with a supplier to the US Miliary, I visited an Army base in Alaska to develop a pre-heat solution for this thing. It's essentially a unimog with backhoe/front end loader bits (a high mobility engineering vehicle).
They called it a Seemog or something like that.
 
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