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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I replaced my valve cover gasket with the standard cork set. Everything went well until I started putting oil in and running it. Oil is pouring out the back of the valve cover and pooling on the manifold. It then runs down over the exhaust and onto the ground. Lots of smoke, and some popping too!

Obviously tomorrow I am taking it off to see what Ive done now, but I was wondering if this has happened to anyone else and what the cause was?
 

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you can crush and tear the gasket if you over torque the nuts. it only requires a few inch-pounds of force (Yes that's INCH pounds not FOOT pounds)



The reason that there are two different types of studs is that the studs that are used with the cork gasket come with a "shoulder" machined on them that is not quiet as tall as the cork gasket is thick. The shoulder is supposed to give the nuts something to tighten up against so that you don't crush the cork. For the rubber gasket it comes with a metal spacer built into it that does the some thing so you replace the original studs with ones that don't have the shoulder.

And Yes I discovered all this the hard way when I changed to the rubber gasket, but once I put in the correct studs I never had another leak in over 10 years.

Steve
 

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I once installed a cork gasket..glued it in place so it wouldnt move. Drop in the plastic oil guard and bolted it all together. When I cranked it up, it was blowing oil out the back like yours.

Took it all apart...found the plastic oil guard had snagged the gasket and pulled it into the head and off the lip where it belongs. There was an open hole to the outside.

fix is to replace the gasket again..doing it right. Probably better to put the oil guard in before the gasket goes on.
 

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fix is to replace the gasket again..doing it right. Probably better to put the oil guard in before the gasket goes on.
It's even better to just switch to the one-piece rubber gasket. :thumbup:
 

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I read you can use the gasket from a Corrado G60. Is this true?
 

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The nuts get tightened to 87 inch/pounds.

Victor-Reinz
It is for a 1990 VW Corrado 1.8L 8V engine
Victor Reinz number 71-31692-00
VW 037-103-483c

It is the same Upgraded Gasket offered by German Auto Parts, but with the part number you can usually source it
locally.

You will need 8 non-shouldered studs, and those you can usually get at a hardware store in the "pick-a-nut" section.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Turns out the gasket was pushed inwards on the back. Not sure what pushed it in, but what I do know is when I put the new one on again I will let the RTV cure before putting the cover on so the gasket doesn't move.

Maybe adjust the valves or at least check the clearances while I am in there again, they seem to be making some noise, but that may be normal for this engine...

Oh well, lesson learned! And I guess its a good thing it did leak, as when I took it apart again today to inspect, I found the timing belt a little loose and flopping against the shroud. Sure is a lot quieter now its tensioned right! :laugh:
 

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Turns out the gasket was pushed inwards on the back. Not sure what pushed it in, but what I do know is when I put the new one on again I will let the RTV cure before putting the cover on so the gasket doesn't move.

Maybe adjust the valves or at least check the clearances while I am in there again, they seem to be making some noise, but that may be normal for this engine...

Oh well, lesson learned! And I guess its a good thing it did leak, as when I took it apart again today to inspect, I found the timing belt a little loose and flopping against the shroud. Sure is a lot quieter now its tensioned right! :laugh:
Never use RTV to seal the gasket. Permatex Hi-Tack is exceptional for cork gaskets. RTV should be used only at the corners of the cam gasket to the head face on the 3 piece gasket set.

The better gasket is the Victor-Reinze that I mentioned earlier.

Silicone (RTV) until it hardens is really a slick item if your valve cover is dimpled in at the back it will scoot the new gasket into the inside. The silicone rtv actually acts as a lube until it hardens.

I have been fighting the head gasket for over 40 years.
 

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One trick that i was taught years ago to use on oil pans and auto tranny pans and would probably help here too.

On most of these pans/covers when the nut is tightened it tends to bend the metal around the bolt hole in. This means that the metal around the hole sticks out farther and makes contact with the gasket before the rest of the pan/cover. So this part of the pan/cover tightens up before the rest of the pan/cover and the areas in between the bolts might not seal up.

What I learned was that before you put the pan/cover back on, to turn it over and use the back end of a Ball-Peen hammer to bend the metal surrounding the bolt hole slightly in the outward direction. This means that the metal surrounding the bolt holes is the last to make contact and if it is tightened down the rest of the pan/cover has to also be tight.

Something so simple and also brilliant.


Steve
 

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all the suggestions here are true about the cork gasket, studs, and flimsy metal valve cover

get the upgraded rubber gasket with new studs and dont over tighten it.
 
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