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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
it it normal for the 1.8L 8v engine to get really hot? I mean the gauge doesn't go past the halfway mark or anything, but after driving it you'll burn you hands on the engine, valve cover, hoses, pretty much anything you can touch, just wondering if that was normal.
 

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Re: Very Hot Engine Compartment? (objectional_content)

200+ deg oil temps.
190+ deg coolant temps.
Normal operating temps, welcome to the world of radiant heat.
 

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Re: Very Hot Engine Compartment? (Eric D)

Quote, originally posted by Eric D »
200+ deg oil temps.
190+ deg coolant temps.
Normal operating temps, welcome to the world of radiant heat.

http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif
There's a reason why food can be cooked in an engine bay: it's just like an oven.
(My apologies to the turkey...
)
 

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those temps are fahrenheit i presume cus my gauges read
oil : 90-120 celsius
water : 87 celsius at all times when warmed up.
i suppose engine gets little warmer than that and exhaust manifold gets really hot.
on the other hand, radiant heat could be your friend as it helps with cooling - a clean engine bay helps cus dirt would insulate it.
 

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Re: (objectional_content)

Quote, originally posted by objectional_content »
anybody ever try to remove some of that radiant heat? i mean I would think components would last a bit longer if they didn't get so hot.
what components would you be talking about? There are things that have been under my hood for 28+ years, as the car is 1980 Rabbit. I'm sure wiring will get brittle, but most other things can survive OK. Some plastic pieces on the new cars tend to degrade, but they were never made with too much longevity in mind anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: (ps2375)

vi guess you have a good point about what components, because most everything looks like original parts on my 1992 golf, only thing that looks new are the coolant hoses.
and to the reply about the mpg would go down, why would that happen?
so if i were to modify my hood so that it had vent that let air rush in over the engine to cool it, i could expect my mpg to drop?
 

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Re: (objectional_content)

If,,, you were to modify your hood, do it to vent the heat. If you do it to scoop in air, you would most likely reduce the air thru the radiator. You want a lower air pressure behind the radiator. Be sides, 99% of the engine cooling is being done by the radiator as compared to radiant cooling of anything else.
One of the few things to do would be to reduce the amount of radiant heat. One way to do that is to have the exhaust coated to keep the heat in the exhaust system, a ceramic coating will help some. Don't use a header wrap on an uncoated system, as it will corrode much faster than normal. http://****************.com/smile/emthdown.gif


Modified by ps2375 at 6:45 PM 11-8-2008
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Re: (ps2375)

interesting, about not using the wrap without coating the exhaust with ceramic.
on a side note, i have noticed that right under my shifter, where the stock leather cover can pop off easily to see the linkage, that gets extremely hot too! also the cubby hole in the bottom of the dash, well, pretty much the whole dash, is this also normal radiant heat in the mk2's?
 

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Re: (objectional_content)

yes, you happen to have a very hot catalytic converter directly under there. Even w/o the cat, the exhaust pipe will heat all of that.
 

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Re: (chickenfriend)

Quote, originally posted by chickenfriend »
At least some Mk 2's featured a temp switch behind the head to keep the radiator fan on a little longer to cool the engine bay.
You could wire-in one of those. Someone told me you can get it in a kit from VW.

Modified by chickenfriend at 6:22 PM 11-9-2008

Thermo time switch but kicks on only after running.
 

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Re: (ps2375)

A louvered hood would be your best bet to release heat without reducing airflow through the radiator. There are shops that can louver your existing hood (best look but most expensive) or you can by weld on metal louvers (these take some work to get installed and looking rightand you have to cut a big hole in your hood).
You can also get plastic louvers that you can rivet on and smooth out with body filler but they don't look very nice when done (same deal with the hole in the hood).
Releasing the heat won't effect your milage unless you have removed the thermostat from your cooling system. Less heat in the engine bay will just cause the thermostat to stay closed more often to maintain operating temperature.
It MIGHT help with the longevity of some engine parts (especially rubber/plastic) but these components are generally made to withstand the heat.
Really the only reason you would need to add a feature like this is if you have done modifications to the engine that make the heat generated by it exceed the capacity of the cooling system to properly cool the engine.


Modified by 90mk2wolf at 7:46 AM 12-7-2008
 

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Has anyone tried hood spacers or washers to force to hot air outward . Im not too sure how easy it is to find vented hoods for some of the newer vehicles like the 2018 passat or any parts at that but worth a try
 

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Yes, had bad temperature problems. Modifications I did: Cut a few air holes in the engine belly plastic. This helped the most in the summer. Same thing with inner fenders, but installed "louvres" there. As well as the grilles in the bumper open all the way, not just in the middle. The engine air intake by using a pipe to the other side far from the side where the exhaust manifold is located. My car is Audi 80 with supercharged 2.0 8v
 
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