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’27 T roadster powered by a blown ’37 Cord V-8 by Lycoming.

He had to run the engine backwards to get the rear drive to work.


 

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’27 T roadster powered by a blown ’37 Cord V-8 by Lycoming.

He had to run the engine backwards to get the rear drive to work.


when not in a hurry off to work, I'm gonna look into this car further. Thanks for ID'ing the engine as I never would have been able too. That thing looks awesome.
 

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when not in a hurry off to work, I'm gonna look into this car further. Thanks for ID'ing the engine as I never would have been able too. That thing looks awesome.


L to R: unknown, Dean Batchelor ?, unknown,
Walt Rose, Randy Shinn
Those exhaust manifolds...

 

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side step over to the Lycoming for a little sound of the engine.

 

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side step over to the Lycoming for a little sound of the engine.

Thanx for the video; it was fun to listen to an unmuffled Cord V8. As a matter of fact, the only V8 engine Lycoming ever built was the 810's L-head V8 (289 cubic inches). It is regarded as one of the best, if not the best, flathead V8s ever made, also, with very good output characteristics, smooth running and lots of potential for additional power (as witnessed by the quick and easy boost achieved by the cash-strapped Cord company when they supercharged it and picked up 50 extra horsepower). It's just a shame that this fine engine died with the Cord empire, since Lycoming was a Cord-held company, too.
 

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^ Nicely put, Larry.

Throwback to the turn of the Century here

Christie. First to get a patent on Front Drive

 

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^

The Packard Predictor. What a name.

:eek:

Ghia workers hand beat the body over wooden forms out of sheet metal.

Roll top roof was a necessity just to get in the thing.













 

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FV-QR

Gar Wood, speedboat king - more photos here: http://apps.detroitnews.com/apps/multimedia/gallery.php?id=14531



Gar Wood, left, and his mechanic Orlin Johnson sit on the Miss America X speed boat on the Detroit River in the 1930s. Without formal education in engineering, Garfield Arthur Wood was a marvel at mechanics. He did more than any other American to develop the speedboat, becoming the first man to go 100 miles an hour on water, and the first to do two miles a minute in a boat. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood drives and Orlin Johnson, his mechanic, enjoy the ride in the Miss America X in July 1932. This seven-and-a-half-ton boat held 300 gallons of gas. It boasted four Packard 12-cylinder motors, was 38 feet long with a 10-foot beam and could go 125 mph. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood, whose hair turned white in the 1950s, was nicknamed "the Gray Fox." The son of an Iowa ferry operator, he was 35 and unknown when he arrived in Detroit in 1935. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood (inset) and boat Gar Junior II in 1921 file photo (Detroit News Archives)



The engine of one of Wood's earlier boats, the Gar Wood VIII, is shown in August 1927. (Detroit News Archives)



Wood drives the Gar Wood VIII in August 1927. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood's residence on the man-made island resort of Grayhaven in 1929. Wood was a wealthy man, and he and his wife had homes in Detroit, Algonac, Georgian Bay, Miami and Honolulu.



In 1931, Wood's Miss America IX (bottom) battles Kaye Don and Miss England II on the Detroit River for the coveted Harnsworth Trophy. Both men crossed the starting line early and were disqualified, but Gar's brother George won the race in the Miss America VIII to keep the trophy in America. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood's airplane in the 1930s. Wood thought that airplane motors had to be more dependable than boat motors, since there was little margin for engine failure in the air. (Detroit News Archives)



This group of officials and drivers at Indianapolis in May 1932 includes judges Edsel Ford, Eddie Rickenbacker, Henry Ford, center, Gar Wood, second from right and Harvey Firestone Sr. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood and his longtime mechanic Orlin Johnson, left, display their teddy bear mascots on Miss America X in September 1932. Wood took the bears with him in every race he ran for 30 years, and they did seem to bring him luck, for he won race after race. (Detroit News Archives)



Wood, left and Johnson hold the bears in 1933. Named Teddy and Bruin, they were decked in racing gear, including miniature cork life preservers. Wood would not race without them, and credited them with saving his and Johnson's lives in a 1928 crash. "They are the captains of my fate," he once said. He kept them until his death. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood's boat works at Algonac in September 1933. Working on engines and boats was the joy of Wood's life. (Detroit News Archives)



This July 24, 1932 photo shows Gar Wood driving and Orlin Johnson, his mechanic, enjoying a ride in the Miss America X. This seven-and-a-half- ton boat held 300 gallons of gas. It boasted four Packard 12- cylinder motors, was 38 feet long with a 10-foot beam and could go 125 mph. (Detroit News Archives)



Wood and Johhnson in Miss America X. The big boat was powered by four 1800-horsepower, 12-cylinder Packard engines :eek:. The boat smashed the world speed record in 1932, becoming the first to go over two miles a minute. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood and his mechanic Orlin Johnson, on the Miss America X speed boat at rest on the Detroit River. (Detroit News Archives)



The Miss America X goes full speed. (Detroit News Archives)



Wood and his team look at one of the engines on the Miss America X. (Detroit News Archives)



Wood and Johnson in Miss America X, July 24 1932. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood poses with Alvin McAuley after breaking a world speed record in September 1932. (Detroit News Archives)



Mechanics listen to a Gar Wood race in 1933. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood, right, chats with Horace Dodge Jr., center, and speedboat racer Hubert Scott-Paine at a Gold Cup Dinner in August 1933. (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood works on a model speedboat with his son Gar Wood Jr. in August 1933. (Imperfections in image are from the original print.) (Detroit News Archives)



Gar Wood in 1959. Wood died at age 90 in Miami in 1971, just a few days before a gigantic civic celebration in his honor was to have been held in Detroit, celebrating the 50th anniversary since his first Harmsworth victory. (Detroit News Archives)
 

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Oh man, what I would give just to hear those Packard engines at full chat!!!
 

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Thank you SO much for the Gar Wood gallery. That is the high point of this entire great thread IMO. That photograph of the group of officials and drivers at IMS in 1932 is INCREDIBLE. I got shivers when I saw it. The photo with Alvan MacCauley is equally impressive. MacCauley, for those unfamiliar with the name, was the president of Packard Motor Car Company from 1916 until 1939, which were the glory years of Packard as an automaker. He was a great leader of a superlative car company.


As an aside, in Champaign, Illinois there is a retirement home called "Gar Wood". I lived in Champaign for some years and always wondered if Wood had anything to do with it such as an endowment or something.
 

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Couple of Harry Miller shots






Miller adjusting a car (in a rather dressed up fashion)
 
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