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I would almost agree with you, but I've noticed looking online that a lot of the actual Italian race cars are right hand drive, and the one in question is left hand drive. Not an expert, just an observation.
The 5-lugs are really getting me too. Older stuff should have knock-ons, 60s cars might have 4-lugs. 5-lug to me suggests 70s-80s or later. Sure, there'd be retrofits, but on something so rare we can't place it, that seems unwise.

Owner said it was on a 308 chassis...I don't see any reason to doubt that. Five lugs, hip point to rear axle, prestige gap, transverse motor w/quad carbs, etc. all look spot on for that. My best guess is that someone backdated a 308 to do some sort of vintage racing showcase.

 

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Person who shot the photos to me said the owner claimed it was on a 308 frame. That makes my guess even worse, because I too was thinking early 60's Elva.
Yeah I think this is the biggest factor - what appears to be a transverse engine setup. Definitely not common (or done at all?) in the 1960s.
 

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The 5-lugs are really getting me too. Older stuff should have knock-ons, 60s cars might have 4-lugs. 5-lug to me suggests 70s-80s or later. Sure, there'd be retrofits, but on something so rare we can't place it, that seems unwise.

Owner said it was on a 308 chassis...I don't see any reason to doubt that. Five lugs, hip point to rear axle, prestige gap, transverse motor w/quad carbs, etc. all look spot on for that. My best guess is that someone backdated a 308 to do some sort of vintage racing showcase.

Completely agree with you there. The five lugs are really out of place for anything period correct, so the 308 frame holds a lot of merit. I wouldn't be surprised if this was someone's one off project/homage to an old racer.
 

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A Dino 246 has 5-lug Cromodora wheels, from the late 1960s onward. So did the 308 GT4.

The wheels and quad-carburetor setup suggest this is too late of a car to be a true Etceterini, as those were from the 40s through the early 60s. Fun fact, not all of them used Italian engines. A number of Bandinis and some Stanguilinis used Crosley engines as they were extremely light and responded well to tuning.

This car looks likely to be a hillclimb special or just a backyard fantasy project (albeit a nicely finished one). The carburetor setup suggests 308 GTB/GT4 V8, or maybe even a Lamborghini Uracco V8... but it's more likely Ferrari considering the other clues that point to a donor car. Perhaps home-built, perhaps based on an existing tubular chassis and updated with the running gear of choice. There are hundreds of different types of these things floating about, so there's really no way to positively ID it without some real history and background info.
 

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A Dino 246 has 5-lug Cromodora wheels, from the late 1960s onward. So did the 308 GT4.

The wheels and quad-carburetor setup suggest this is too late of a car to be a true Etceterini, as those were from the 40s through the early 60s. Fun fact, not all of them used Italian engines. A number of Bandinis and some Stanguilinis used Crosley engines as they were extremely light and responded well to tuning.

This car looks likely to be a hillclimb special or just a backyard fantasy project (albeit a nicely finished one). The carburetor setup suggests 308 GTB/GT4 V8, or maybe even a Lamborghini Uracco V8... but it's more likely Ferrari considering the other clues that point to a donor car. Perhaps home-built, perhaps based on an existing tubular chassis and updated with the running gear of choice. There are hundreds of different types of these things floating about, so there's really no way to positively ID it without some real history and background info.
Agreed on the wheels (I mentioned it on page 1) and on the engine based on carb setup. I also agree it appears to be a home grown race car which was very popular thing to do back in the day.

Speaking of red race cars from back in the day, I've been meaning to ask you about a particular car that's for sale. Will send you PM.
 

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Another off the wall thought, could this potentially be a car based on a Pontiac Fiero chassis? Would cover the 5 lugs wheels and transverse rear engine. Pontiac Fiero's were a popular chassis to use for a variety of mods.
 

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This was my first thought. Of course RUSH is fresh in my mind, with the recent 1-year anniversary of Neil Peart's passing.

Red Barchetta:

 

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I would almost agree with you, but I've noticed looking online that a lot of the actual Italian race cars are right hand drive, and the one in question is left hand drive. Not an expert, just an observation.
The front hood is also odd with this car. Most of the racers of that era had a mid-centet cutout for al motor up front. For whatever reason this is a rear engined car with a uniquely large frunk that extends all the way to the front grill.
 

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Those carburetors look like there is a transverse Tipo105/106 v8 from the Ferrari 308/Mondail/328 underneath them. The five lug hubs also point to one of the above cars could have been the donor vehicle.

Body also looks like it might be fiberglass. Definitely homebuilt or a kit, like one of those Cobras that uses a bunch of Mustang II parts. The question is, how much of the donor Ferrari is underneath that body?

Edit - I just read the rest of the thread, and saw this was already brought up.
 

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So did the boatpeople make a car or somethin'?

Need to know the story here!


The Riva Aquarama is a luxury wooden runabout built by Italian yachtbuilder Riva. Production of it and its derivatives (the Lungo, Super, and Special) ran from 1962 until 1996. The hull was based on the Riva Tritone, an earlier model speedboat by Riva, which in turn was inspired by the American mahogany Chris-Craft runabouts. The boat's speed, beauty, and craftsmanship earned it praise as the Ferrari of the boat world. The company was founded by Pietro Riva in 1842, and run by Carlo Riva through its 1969 sale to the American Whittaker Corporation.

The most famous of Carlo Riva’s designs, the Aquarama has become over the decades a nautical legend. Its evocative name, derived in part from the widescreen Cinerama movie format popular in the early 1960s, echoed in its sweeping wrap-around windshield, conjures images from another time.


 
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