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Again, I do not believe there is an official way of storing it. By putting it in a plastic bag, that would keep any liquid from smelling up the place. I have seen the cosmoline wax paper from way back when, but that was usually for non fuel related parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay and for the third time, when you purchase a new CIS fuel pump there IS a liquid inside of it, I am trying very hard to find out what that liquid is so I can use it to store mine, anyone that has the answer please respond.

The question does not refer to the electronic in-tank transfer pump but rather the mechanical CIS exterior fuel pump.

Butcher, you do not have the answer to the question so there is no need to reply. I will post the question again, for the third time below to preserve continuity of this thread and in hopes to get an answer.

Do the CIS fuel pumps need to be stored wet as they are when new? If so, what kind of liquid goes in there?
 

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The liquid in the pump is used for testing the pump, ie QC. Not for storage. The liquid they use during testing is not as flammable due to the safety issues with running gas.

Sorry that the answer is not what you want to hear. Let me know what answer you want to read and I will be happy to post that for you.

THERE IS NO FLUID USED TO STORE A PUMP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
It's still the same question, what is the liquid?? If it's just for testing then I find it odd that they would keep said liquid in the pump with end caps during the shipping process.

THERE IS NO FLUID USED TO STORE A PUMP.
Yes there is fluid inside all new pumps with end caps, that's how they are stored by the manufacturer and shipped.

 

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The fluid is for QC testing, NOT storage. So when I say they is no fluid for STORAGE, that is a true statement. IF I said there was not fluid, I would be wrong. I'm still waiting for others to chime in, but it does not appear they either know or care to help.

On the bright side, this topic still makes it to the top to get maximum exposure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I do understand your reasoning but I've had a few CIS pump failures due to lack of fuel lubrication. It just seems like an awful lot of extra time, money and effort for them to completely fill the pump with liquid and put end caps on there just to ship it. I mean that liquid and those plastic caps cost money so they're not just going to do it for no reason. I just don't want to store the pump with any fuel or anything flammable in it but I also don't want to store it dry.
 

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After installing 8 pumps on 6 mkIs I have never had a new pump with any sort of liquid in the pump. The few seconds that it will be running dry after installation is not enough to wreck a pump. Store them on their side, dry in a plastic bag and a couple desiccant bags wouldn't be a bad idea either.
 

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FYI, as a shop owner, most [if not all] fuel pumps have caps on them. Most of the newer style pumps are dry. My guess is that they do not want anything inside the pump during shipping. A small piece of Styrofoam or other debris will cause serious issues with the fuel system. I for certain would not want that liability.

I do not know what fluid it is, but was thick [compared to gas]. You could pump some light oil through it. I used to use old fuel pumps to suck oil out of engines. The used pumps lasted for 6months or more of daily use [the old pumps were faulty/noisy and that's why they were replaced].

When I was younger, I received a transmissions service kit from the parts counter. The car came back with a bad shifting transmission a few days later. It appears that the drain plug seal fell into the output side of the transmission filter and then scattered throughout the transmission/valvebody. I did notice at the time, I was missing the drain plug seal and received another one that day. I never thought that it fell into the transmission filter. Lesson learned and logistics changed in the parts dept [they now tape the seal to the filter].
 

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Think about it. If you made lots of fuel pumps, you would want to keep them in immaculate condition for as long as possible. They are basically filled with a gear oil, that keeps them from oxidization, and end caps to keep out debris. I would imagine, however, that some companies do not store them for great lengths of time and fill smaller orders; and therefore do not bother with the expense, and may simply spray them a film of oil, and plastic bag them.:thumbup:
 

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They are not filled with gear oil. I work in the industry and install pumps for a living. There is nothing in the pumps now. They are dry.
 

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I ALWAYS store my fuel pumps under my car, and put fuel inside them. Every day I operate the pump and push the fuel through a high quality OEM VW filter. I store the fuel nearby in a large tank. Some of the fuel is bled off each cycle, this runs the tank to about 1/4 each week. I have a gauge hooked up, and when it gets to about 1/4 I fill it up with fresh fuel from a fuel supplier. About every 3 months I run a fuel additive through the system that helps get rid of any moisture that might have formed in the tank and helps clean the lines. Every year I change the filter.

This is the recommended way to store a fuel pump. Stored in this fashion it will last roughly 20-30 years.
 
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