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Any mfg should have to make at least somewhere around 300 examples to qualify for a "production car". For example: the homologation Rally B class, 200 examples had to be made.
 

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Reminds me of the super specific drag racing records

Fastest black 1996 Supra Turbo 6 speed manual on 18x9 TE37s at 1036ft above sea level with stock radio. Who gives a **** :confused:
 

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Any mfg should have to make at least somewhere around 300 examples to qualify for a "production car". For example: the homologation Rally B class, 200 examples had to be made.
C&D reported they are planning 100 units. Is 100/200/300 categorically different?

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Any mfg should have to make at least somewhere around 300 examples to qualify for a "production car". For example: the homologation Rally B class, 200 examples had to be made.
C&D reported they are planning 100 units. Are 100/200/300 categorically different?
 

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That was the least dramatic acceleration video I've seen. Mosey on up to 200 and then just steady to 330. 13 year old me would've thought this was the coolest thing ever.

I count it as a production car. Otherwise the McLaren doesnt count. If its road legal, has airbags and is available for purchase as is - its production to me.
 

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That was the least dramatic acceleration video I've seen. Mosey on up to 200 and then just steady to 330. 13 year old me would've thought this was the coolest thing ever.

I count it as a production car. Otherwise the McLaren doesnt count. If its road legal, has airbags and is available for purchase as is - its production to me.
Apparently, the relatively slow acceleration was intentional to keep turbo temperatures in check as the car got up to speed.

My issue with this record is it is increasingly a game of Russian roulette with the tires. A tire blowout at 300+ is likely death for the driver. You can build a tire that will do 200mph without too much issue, but building a 300+ tire is a much bigger problem. Since this is supposed to be a "street" car and the record is set on tarmac, they can't use solid wheels like the jet/rocket powered landspeed record cars. Evidently, they were able to build a tire that withstood those speeds, but I seriously question how much safety factor they had, and whether such safety factor is even knowable given manufacturing variances. Secondary issue is cross winds- a big unexpected gust could likewise kill the driver.
 

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This will be an unreliable, uncomfortable, dangerous and ultimately pointless car with exorbitant running costs. Do not want.
 

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This will be an unreliable, uncomfortable, dangerous and ultimately pointless car with exorbitant running costs. Do not want.
Worse than the $42,000 Veyron tires that needed to be mailed to a special facility to be mounted, and changed often even if you didn't drive the car?
 

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I don’t mean to disparage Nelson Racing Engines. But there’s no getting around the fact that a bespoke 1,750hp forced induction engine will have extraordinary maintenance requirements and a relatively short lifespan.

I know it’s all relative to the cost of the vehicle in the first place. So costly rebuilds every few years and lots of upkeep are par for the course. And comparatively, it’s probably no worse than the maintenance on a fancy motor yacht or jet. Or a race car for that matter. Which brings me back to being pointless and out of touch.

The supercar might still play well in the Middle East, and in certain cities like LA, Miami, London, etc. where conspicuous consumption is ordinary. But to me it’s just a big ball of wasted potential and distasteful extravagance. Environmental, safety and legal considerations mean the traditional supercar is doomed. Why even bother making this thing street legal in the first place?
 

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That was the least dramatic acceleration video I've seen. Mosey on up to 200 and then just steady to 330. 13 year old me would've thought this was the coolest thing ever.

I count it as a production car. Otherwise the McLaren doesnt count. If its road legal, has airbags and is available for purchase as is - its production to me.
Doesn't the US waive certain legalization requirements for very low volume cars?
 

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Pretty crazy to do that on a road and the acceleration after 200mph is insane. I assume that it's a handful to drive.
 

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Doesn't the US waive certain legalization requirements for very low volume cars?
It depends. Like how Lotus was able to get more non-compliant cars into the US than average, but McLaren didn't get a single F1 imported successfully though 3rd party importers of course got several F1s legally imported. It seems to be a bit more murky for the really low volume stuff.

I think it's cool and I clicked on the thread ready to say "Ok but you need to make 100+ to be a serial production car in my book" and see the claim that this company is going to make at least 100 of them. So I'll call it fair enough. I do believe that such speed records are less and less important as we're talking about speeds that should really only be done up in the flight levels in airplanes, not down on the ground in cars. I feel like I've lived in an odd period of time when I was a child and we had the choked off non-performing performance cars of the 70's malaise era then just improving year after year until cars basically aren't even useful in the real world at the top end. Like at least in 1980, pretty much any high performing car could still make the claim that the autobahn was where you could really use that 150-170mph top speed of a car like a 911 or Ferrari. The autobahn is still a good place for 155mph cars, which makes the idea of a 300+ mph car even more absurd though.

I'm not against it, it just doesn't make sense to me, especially when we're seeing the prices on many hypercars up in the multi-million dollar range where you really can buy a 300mph turboprop or light jet instead.
 

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I think it's cool and I clicked on the thread ready to say "Ok but you need to make 100+ to be a serial production car in my book" and see the claim that this company is going to make at least 100 of them. So I'll call it fair enough. I do believe that such speed records are less and less important as we're talking about speeds that should really only be done up in the flight levels in airplanes, not down on the ground in cars. I feel like I've lived in an odd period of time when I was a child and we had the choked off non-performing performance cars of the 70's malaise era then just improving year after year until cars basically aren't even useful in the real world at the top end. Like at least in 1980, pretty much any high performing car could still make the claim that the autobahn was where you could really use that 150-170mph top speed of a car like a 911 or Ferrari. The autobahn is still a good place for 155mph cars, which makes the idea of a 300+ mph car even more absurd though.

I'm not against it, it just doesn't make sense to me, especially when we're seeing the prices on many hypercars up in the multi-million dollar range where you really can buy a 300mph turboprop or light jet instead.
Top speed has always been more of an engineering bragging point than actual real world used spec.
It would be easy to argue that designing a car for top speed seriously compromises its use at normal public road speeds.
We should all drive a Buick Century.
Who need to go faster than 100 anyways?
 
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