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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know the name for these parts, but they are a thin piece of bent stainless steel that fit between the little tabs at the ends of the brake pads and the bracket the pads sit in.

Provides a smoother gliding surface for the pad than sitting directly on the rusting metal of the bracket.

These were on the rear of the '01 A4 Quattro I'm working on, but new ones didn't come with the kit I bought.

Most pictures I've seen show people not using these. I've done that too in the past on other cars, but if they provide some additional benefit, I'd like to use them, if I can find them.

What are these called?
 

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Anti vibration tabs, clips. Yes, reusing the old ones is alright. If you disassembled them and it worked without them, that’s ok too. They are designed to limit squeaks and noise.


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They are also used as a wear item. If you have done/seen as many brakes that I have, you will know that some cheaper cars [ie American companies] may not have them. When the brakes move, they will wear out the caliper. Over time, the soft cast iron caliper will be worn out and the new pads will fit loosely.

Using the stainless clips/sliders, these can be changed so there is no real wear surface that cannot be replaced. If the kit did not come with them, then you probably bought the brake parts by price. Focus on buying good quality not price when working on brakes. There is a reason cheap brakes are cheap.

When it comes to brakes, you really need to think that if you do not do it right, then you could kill yourself or someone else. Comparing to what is right against what some hack does on the internet is not a real comparison at all. Do it right or send it to someone who can.

Sorry to sound like a jacka$$ but I really do not believe people take brakes as serious as they should.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
No problem. Zimmermann discs and Akebono pads in a full kit from fcpuro.com. I was surprised it didn't come with the "sliders" and I couldn't find any others, so I cleaned them up and reused them.
 

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You'll probably be fine without new sliders. I believe they are stainless and certainly harder than the brake pad backing.

I've had mixed results with Akebono pads. Everyone of my clients likes how the wheels do not get as dirty. Some come back after a few months complaining that they squeal. I put them on m wife's car and so far, no noises and the wheels are clean.
 

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They’re stainless so you’re more likely to crease them the wrong way b4 they wear. I use caliper grease and the clips to keep them from squeaking and moo’ing. Just be sure to keep the grease off the braking surfaces and only on the caliper to pad contact points.

I use only Bosch, copper fee ceramic pads and zinc plated drilled/counter sunk & slotted rotors. It equates to zero noise, clean wheels, zero pad material build up (warping), zero hot spotting, almost instantaneous water shedding and almost zero brake residue.


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they're called anti rattle clips but they do more than just keeping your brakes from rattling (at least vw/audi).

the brake shoes need a nice smooth surface to be able to slide on to properly engage/disengage when you push the brake peddle. The clip provides this smooth surface. As others have already pointed out, you should also apply caliper grease on the parts of the clips that will touch the brake shoes (usually, the "ears"). If you get any grease on the rotor, be sure to wipe off and clean with a little brake cleaner on a rag. Once the shoes have been installed, I like to manually move them (slide them) in the clip back and forth to ensure they can move without binding. Likely no shop will do this.

You should also ensure that the caliper glide pins have some spring to them so that the pad doesn't drag on the rotor when the brake disengages. Sometimes you will need to pull those pins, clean them, relube, and reinstall. No biggie.
 
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