VW Vortex - Volkswagen Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought anything above 4000K should give off a bluer color. However, my friend got a set of 5000K bulbs and at startup they look blue, but they eventually settle at a nasty halogen yellow. I had a friend w/ stock (brand new) IS300 bulbs, and they look whitish/blue in contrast. Why is this? Does the shape and type of the reflector even come into play w/ color output?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
431 Posts
Re: Why do 5000K (HIDS) look more yellow than 4000K? (bung_goo)

Quote, originally posted by bung_goo »
I thought anything above 4000K should give off a bluer color. However, my friend got a set of 5000K bulbs and at startup they look blue, but they eventually settle at a nasty halogen yellow. I had a friend w/ stock (brand new) IS300 bulbs, and they look whitish/blue in contrast. Why is this? Does the shape and type of the reflector even come into play w/ color output?

There are a lot of variables that come into play. First off, time of day that you are looking at the lights. During the day they will look like halogens.
Optics play a large role (ie. comparing projectors to reflector-type HIDs)...
Manufacturer plays a large role if it is not a philips/ge/osram bulb.
"Fly-by-night" hid bulb manufacturers tend to have low quality control and make a bulb that is not what is advertised (as far as kelvin output).
Later,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,119 Posts
Re: Why do 5000K (HIDS) look more yellow than 4000K? (bung_goo)

Kelvin ratings don't really have much meaning for HIDs. They work for halogen bulbs that behave like black body radiators - but that's not what HIDs are. So I think the Kelvin ratings in this case are just some number picked by the manufacturer.
But I don't know why it matters to everybody what color their HIDs are unless they are just trying to copy the look of some other cars headlights?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
431 Posts
Yea, Dennis makes a great point. There are MANY MANY ways of determining kelvin color as well. Some testing is done with the light in the housing (not good). It tests light output with the housing affecting the color (optics).
But there are standards to go by (as far as DOT is concerned). It also matters at what part of the beam you are measuring kelvin.
And, the most likely case:
Most of these "fly-by-night" companies that make these bulbs just don't care or want to invest in getting this equipment that they just look at the light and say, "yea, that's 5000 kelvin".
What they mostly end up doing is producing lamps that, in relative terms, are higher or lower in kelvin than their partners. So, a higher kelvin will always be a tad bit bluer but since they aren't really measuring correctly it's only relative to their other bulbs...and as Dennis says, it really is just a rating picked by the manufacturer - and not tested.
Later,
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top