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Wait that much boost with what cam/head work. I've lost a good 2 maybe 3 psi going from a Stock cam to a 272/272. (although the car feels faster, and likes to be reved more)

Lets talk pulley size, what's about the smallest you can safely run up to 6000rpm?
 

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my lysholm is over 10 years old. I am honestly not sure of the mileage I am sure its up there. I run a 55mm pulley on it and daily drive it everyday. Its stage 4 I peak at 18lbs of boost but I am losing 2 - 3lbs through the stupid amounts of intercooler piping I have.

I just wish BBM supplied a sticker along the lines of "Yeah..you're right its my power steering pump"
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
reliability with a G lader :rolleyes: now there's an oxymoron if I ever heard one.
Reliability, absolutely....we get good g-laders in the shop every single week. Unfortunately we also get some bad ones. These are now over 20 yrs old! I'd call that pretty darn reliable for any forced induction unit to run that long, pretty amazing.
Just like any form of forced induction, the condition and reliability is greatly affected by the user and maintenance.
If you run a good air filter that is not rubbing and damaged, the charger will not suck up dirt and wear out prematurely. If you change the oil and keep your boost return misting back into the charger as intended....it will lubricate the apex strips and run strong for a very very long time. The ones the we see broken, worn excessively or damaged are from poor maintenance. Start with a good one, take care of it and get another 20+yrs of reliable run time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #104 ·
Wait that much boost with what cam/head work. I've lost a good 2 maybe 3 psi going from a Stock cam to a 272/272. (although the car feels faster, and likes to be reved more)

Lets talk pulley size, what's about the smallest you can safely run up to 6000rpm?
Safely run, has many variables... What is the condition of the unit? How hard is it boosted and the car driven? How much time does it stay in boost? What is the maintenance like....another question mark?
I personally have owned more than a few G60's and have never broken or blown a G60 g-lader. I've ran around with a 58mm. 65mm can be very safe on a good unit....even smaller. Depends on how you treat it. Some people treat G60 PG engines like they are Honda street bike motors and think they should rev the $h1t out of them to the moon. This is not a happy place for the g-lader...bouncing off rev limit a no / no. I shift at 6k and avoid the rev limit. More rpm on this engine is not where the performance is at, grab a gear and use the torque.
 

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Reliability, absolutely....we get good g-laders in the shop every single week. Unfortunately we also get some bad ones. These are now over 20 yrs old! I'd call that pretty darn reliable for any forced induction unit to run that long, pretty amazing.
Just like any form of forced induction, the condition and reliability is greatly affected by the user and maintenance.
If you run a good air filter that is not rubbing and damaged, the charger will not suck up dirt and wear out prematurely. If you change the oil and keep your boost return misting back into the charger as intended....it will lubricate the apex strips and run strong for a very very long time. The ones the we see broken, worn excessively or damaged are from poor maintenance. Start with a good one, take care of it and get another 20+yrs of reliable run time.
Safely run, has many variables... What is the condition of the unit? How hard is it boosted and the car driven? How much time does it stay in boost? What is the maintenance like....another question mark?
I personally have owned more than a few G60's and have never broken or blown a G60 g-lader. I've ran around with a 58mm. 65mm can be very safe on a good unit....even smaller. Depends on how you treat it. Some people treat G60 PG engines like they are Honda street bike motors and think they should rev the $h1t out of them to the moon. This is not a happy place for the g-lader...bouncing off rev limit a no / no. I shift at 6k and avoid the rev limit. More rpm on this engine is not where the performance is at, grab a gear and use the torque.
^^Absolutely agree :thumbup: :thumbup:
 

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Safely run, has many variables... What is the condition of the unit? How hard is it boosted and the car driven? How much time does it stay in boost? What is the maintenance like....another question mark?
I personally have owned more than a few G60's and have never broken or blown a G60 g-lader. I've ran around with a 58mm. 65mm can be very safe on a good unit....even smaller. Depends on how you treat it. Some people treat G60 PG engines like they are Honda street bike motors and think they should rev the $h1t out of them to the moon. This is not a happy place for the g-lader...bouncing off rev limit a no / no. I shift at 6k and avoid the rev limit. More rpm on this engine is not where the performance is at, grab a gear and use the torque.
Yeah I find it to useless to rev past 6000rpm, I usually grab the next gear just before 6000, so like 5800rpm-ish. Mine seems to be pulling the best in the 4000-5200rpm range anyways. I assume peak torque in that area somewhere.

So since I never rev past 6000, I run a 68mm now, and I'm thinking about a change to a 63mm.

Is that a noticeable change?
 

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reliability with a G lader :rolleyes: now there's an oxymoron if I ever heard one.

The G-Ladders have service interval requirements based upon what they're asked to do. When they don't get rebuilt on that one simple requirement and get run into that G-Ladder Twilight Zone ... THAT's the Oxymoron you hear justifying and blaming the G-Ladder for not rebuilding itself
 

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ive heard running more boost can also be a bad thing if you can't support the airflow and if the intercooler can't handle the additional airflow.

right now im on a fully built motor, ported head, euroboost tubes but stock intercooler, stock rebuilt glader and a 68mm pulley.

i want it to burn the tires in 2nd and right now they only spin when the tires gets light. ive debated on going to a smaller pulley but id like to find power elsewhere considering im not even properly tuned yet, just chipped. methanol injection has crossed my mind but an intercooler is ALWAYS there.
 

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I know there are benefits and disadvantages to both turbo and superchargers. This is just my opinion, but turbos have gotten so much better in the last couple of years and I think the knowledge around them is so much better as well. The guys that really have issues with turbos and lag have either gone with a cheap ebay or junk yard set ups that dont really fit their application. Basically the guys that have issues go out and pull a turbo from a diesel train and wondering why it doesnt work well or doesnt build any boost until 5k. I think the other achilles heel for older turbos was engine managment, which is leaps and bounds better. The real big selling point of a supercharger was ease of installation/packaging and ability to be in boost very quickly or off idle. Most of the newer turbo cars or guys that did their turbo right, you never feel or notice lag anymore and they dont seem to run out of steam on the top end. Again, I just really think this falls into which school of thought you like. Not that this is 8v related, but I watch a little bit of drag racing. More and more you see the former supercharged guys trying turbos and not going back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
I know there are benefits and disadvantages to both turbo and superchargers. This is just my opinion, but turbos have gotten so much better in the last couple of years and I think the knowledge around them is so much better as well. The guys that really have issues with turbos and lag have either gone with a cheap ebay or junk yard set ups that dont really fit their application. Basically the guys that have issues go out and pull a turbo from a diesel train and wondering why it doesnt work well or doesnt build any boost until 5k. I think the other achilles heel for older turbos was engine managment, which is leaps and bounds better. The real big selling point of a supercharger was ease of installation/packaging and ability to be in boost very quickly or off idle. Most of the newer turbo cars or guys that did their turbo right, you never feel or notice lag anymore and they dont seem to run out of steam on the top end. Again, I just really think this falls into which school of thought you like. Not that this is 8v related, but I watch a little bit of drag racing. More and more you see the former supercharged guys trying turbos and not going back.
Really.... I haven't seen much change in them. EFI and stand alone have been around forever now. I've ran ceramic ball bearing turbos since they came out and the new big deal billet wheel technology. The billet wheel deal is more of an oh boy its new technology marketing. They are a bit better. They still lag and.....pause between shifts.... So not really sure what you are referring to hear. I've got one car with a Garrett ceramic bearing GT30 billet wheel, also ran the GT28 and Precisions versions. Turbos still lag and need to build boost. Please show me this new no lag turbo technology.

You are seeing more turbos in drag racing because Lysholm type twin screws are not allowed in NHRA sanctioned events. They were banned due to what I understand was considered unfair advantage. Go do some research on this and check it out. I'd pull some good info up for you...but we are way slammed this time of year. So my time on here is starting to get limited. Top fuel still fasted cars in the world run superchargers. If they allowed the twin screw in NHRA sanctioned events, you would see these cars as the quickest on the planet.
 

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Guaranteed no Lag Turbo right here buddy :mad:

Computer Guided, Laser Cut 10 Blade Turbine
Spooling @ 20,000 RPMs+
Maximum Boost in less than 1/10 of a second
2” – 3.5” Rubber Couplers
High-Flow Air Filter
Step-by-step Installation Guide
Batteries not included
Heavy Duty Securing Clamps

What did I here em say about chrome and home?
 

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Discussion Starter · #115 · (Edited)
as above i guess i was mistaken, i'm not a heating and air conditioning person haha just in context it seemed as if they were discussing the screw type chargers but after reading he referred to as scroll... my bad... though i would rather a G60 over a centrifugal haha

though makes me wonder how did the G60 "lysholm" get that nickname? being the charger is clearly an Opcon by the case as opposed to Lysholm chargers having heat sink fins like Eaton has used for years. oh and if we're speaking affiliation Opcon is actually the parent company to Lysholm. Also you, BBM, publicly offer up the info that the charger is an Opcon Autorotor 2087. i have always been baffled by that... really miss mine though :banghead:
This is a long and complicated, confusing topic.
The history of Elliott-Lysholm. The screw type charger was invented by another man earlier in history. The technology was not there to mfg. it. Elliott was the first to mfg. a twin screw unit. The article I have in my hands is dated June, 1943 Initially the Lysholm twin screw cooled and exchanged the air in a jet fighter cabin. This technology is also used for air compressor units, we have one that supplies our machine shop. Yes Lysholm sounds cool, SRM owns the rights to this name and we will no longer use it. cheers :)
 

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Here's some cool tec stuff that's being used with a turbo set ups for anti lag. It's been around for some time and getting more refined over time. Seems to be working well for Subaru guys. I also talked to some Supra/RX7 guys this weekend using there own design with success.

If you wait until the first S12 that appears in the video below, you can hear the engine idle change. They leave the start line at 1800 rpm and 3.5 BAR absoloute boost pressure which is 51.45 PSI of boost. The ford/skoda and Grp N cars leave at 5-6000rpm.
 
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